Tag Archives: Covington Aircraft

AirVenture Oshkosh Airshow Schedule and Events

 

This year commemorates 100 years of airmail service.

oshkosh-blog-500x198The airshow schedule for the AirVenture Oshkosh event is like a carnival, a major sporting event and a camping trip all rolled into one and 2011 marks the 59th occurrence of this event that has grown to attract the attention of major airplane manufacturers and military air services alike. One of the highlights of this year’s show will be the arrival of the massive Boeing 787, which will be open for public tours for the first time.


The 2011 AirVenture will begin on Saturday, July 23 at 8:30 a.m.

AirVenture will cover two weekends and the week in between, with the last scheduled event taking place at 1:45 – 2:15 p.m. CDT on Sunday, July 31. During this week, there will always be something to see and do, whether it will be the Bonanzas to Oshkosh on Saturday, July 23 starting at 1:00 p.m. (the 21st annual arrival of 100 or so Bonanzas, flying in formation), or the Gary Sinise and Lt. Dan Band, whose repertoire includes everything from Bruce Springsteen to Linkin Park, Aretha Franklin and Jimi Hendrix on Friday, July 29 starting at 7:00 p.m. There’s always something to see and do at this premier event!

Go for a ride in the world’s largest airship.

The world’s largest flying airship will be offering 45 minute tours of the site of AirVenture, taking off and landing at Pioneer Airport. The Zepplin NT Farmers Airship is 246 feet in length, which is 15 feet longer than a Boeing 747 and 50 feet longer than any blimp currently in operation. With room to carry 12 passengers, the Farmers Airship is capable of a speed of 77 miles per hour with a 500 mile range. Other options that will get you airborne are to book a ride on a Ford Tri-motor, a beautifully restored B-17G or a Bell 47 Helicopter (like the ones seen on the television show M*A*S*H*).
Starting on Monday, July 25, there will be an airshow daily at 3:30 p.m. through Saturday, July 30.
Anyone who has ever been to AirVenture can tell you that the airshows at this event are not like anywhere else; the aviation experts know that they are performing in front of many fellow aviators and will go that extra little bit in order to shine for an appreciative crowd! There will be many types and kinds of planes flying in these shows, including many former combat designs. While some acts will participate in all airshows, their routines might differ from show to show—which makes it worthwhile to attend them all!

After a long day on the flight line, enjoy an evening’s entertainment.

Starting on Monday with REO Speedwagon performing for the annual opening concert, there will be the evening entertainment for which the EAA AirVenture has become known. Each night will find something happening at the Theater in the Woods, an open air pavilion-style theater with seating for 3500 and ample room to accommodate additional seating for those who bring blankets and lawn chairs. Whether planned or impromptu, there will always be something entertaining or informative happening here, including Gary Sinise and the Lt. Dan Band on Friday July 29, and Aaron Tippin on Saturday July 30. Also, every night the weather permits, a giant, five-story outdoor movie screen will feature an aviation film introduced by a celebrity guest. To wrap up the evenings at AirVenture will be the Night Air Show and Daher-Socata Fireworks on Saturday, July 30, starting at approximately 8:45 p.m. You’ll want to stake your spot early, as this show draws tens of thousands to the flight line.

And don’t miss stopping by the Covington Aircraft booth – number 261!

With all the top aviation talent, so many new and interesting things to see and do, and the chance to share a love of flying with so many who share those feelings, this Oshkosh event is one that the whole family should experience.

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brings together half a million aviation enthusiasts who come and go by car, bus or in one of 10,000 planes.

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Covington Aircraft: Internationally certified destination for Aircraft Engine Overhauls

Did you know that Covington Aircraft is internationally certified for maintenance, repair, and overhaul of PT6A turbine engines and R-985 and R1340 radial engines?

David Hamilton, aviation expert, is here for your needs and explains our global reach!

We’re excited about providing service to our customers here at home and worldwide in the Global Aircraft Community!

Covington Aircraft helps customers worldwide so no matter where you are, we can take care of you.  Whether your engine is being overhauled in our state-of-the-art Pratt &Whitney Canada approved facility, or we are coming to work at your location, Covington is your Global Aviation partner.

Call us from anywhere in the world or visit us on the web at covingtonaircraft.com

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TBO: Time Between Overhaul. Even the PT6A Needs Maintenance

Covington Aircraft has now been in business since 1979.  Over the last 30 plus years, we have seen some Agricultural Aircraft owners who were riskier than even the most daring stunt pilots. How so? Well, they try, much like those who push the oil change on their vehicle, to put off as long as possible the overhaul of their engine. We focus on what to look for and Time Between Overhaul in this post.

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The Ag industry often overlooks FAA Part 91/137 (Agricultural Operations) regarding recommendations for TBO, or Time Between Overhaul.  TBO is overhauling an engine at the manufacturers recommended times.  Often, Ag industry pilots are under the mistaken impression that PT6A engines don’t need these recommended overhauls, when this couldn’t be further from the truth.

SB 14503 (-67AG)

Pratt Service Bulletins governing TBO for this engine indicate that the first stage power turbine blades should be replaced at 12,000 hours, while second stage power turbine blades should be replaced at 5,000 hours.  Compressor Turbine Blades with certain part numbers must be replaced at 6,000 hours.  Main-line rotor bearings #1 and 4 as well as the first stage planet gear set’s sun gear should be replaced at 12,000 hours time.  Considering these low hours, it stands to reason that the PT6A will not fly forever if the recommendations are not followed.

PT6A-34AG SB 1303

pw-pt6aThe 5000 Hour Check, which involves removing the disc from the hot section, removing blades from the disc, cleaning and conducting non-destructive testing, is recommended for the first time at 5,000 hours and at 3,000 hour intervals after that.  This inspection also requires comparison of the actual length of the blade but they cannot be cracked.  Cracked turbine blades or those stretched beyond limits could be devastating to an aircraft.

These two simple recommendations indicate that PT6A engines do not last forever.  Failure to follow these recommendations could result in engine failure.  In addition, Pratt & Whitney places significant importance on maintenance recommendations when honoring warranty repairs.  Therefore, it is important that owners educate themselves on service bulletins and overhaul recommendations to avoid catastrophe.

If it has been too long of a TBO for you or you have general maintenance, sales, or overhaul questions, make sure you visit the Covington Aircraft website!  Happy Flying!

 

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Global Turbine & Radial Aircraft Engine Sales and Overhaul Company has long Local History

Find our more about Covington Aircraft at www.covingtonaircraft.com

It’s pretty cool to say you work for an aircraft company.  Hi everyone, I’m Aaron Abbott and I’m proud to say that I work for a company that has been around for almost 40 years.  When Covington Aircraft first started, it began working on the Pratt & Whitney R-985 and R-1340 radial engines as a way to take care of the air cargo industry.

Now, Covington Aircraft is one of the few OEM authorized MRO facilities in the world.  Still true to our beginnings we continue to overhaul and maintain the radial engines, but in the mid 90’s we added the Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6a series engines to our list of capabilities.  This allows us the ability to take care of the corporate and agricultural markets in a more effective way.

Covington Aircraft is not just a company that specializes in the overhaul and maintenance of aircraft engines, but also sets an example for other companies with its tried and true dedication to being a company entrenched in integrity.  Our word is our bond.  It is our goal as a company to provide the customer with dependable service, at affordable prices, and it is our commitment to do this with exceptional service.

We’re among the world’s leading maintenance, repair, and overhaul facilities, specializing in the PT6A turbine and R-985 and R-1340 radial engines and accessories.  And we are proud to offer the fastest turnaround time and lowest prices in the business.

We also offer 24 hour worldwide aircraft on ground support.

Feel free to contact us today at covingtonaircraft.com

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The R-1340: The Pratt & Whitney Radial Engine that started it all

Covington Aircraft firmly believes in the history of aviation (you can’t get to where your going without knowing where you have been).  So, this week, we talk about the modern marvel that is 100 years old, R-1340 Engine, Pratt & Whitney’s first engine.

Mr. Willgoos and Mr. Mead innovate a Modern Marvel

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In 1925, President Calvin Coolidge had his inaugural address broadcast over the radio, a first in the United States.  Richard Drew invented scotch tape, making it easier for the world to wrap Christmas presents, in 1925 as well.  However, one of the most important firsts to happen in 1925 was the conception and development of the R-1340 engine, a single-row, nine-cylinder air-cooled radial design.  Brought to life by Andy Willgoos and George J. Mead, the R-1340, which became the cornerstone of Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, was discovered in the small backyard garage owned by Mr. Willgoos.

Innovative Design

The difference in the R-1340 engine from other engines was the supercharger or blower section which has remained unchanged since its humble beginnings in 1925.  The blower section is attached to the rear power case and receives the fuel/air mixture from the impeller assembly.  This mixture is delivered to the cylinders via the intake pipes and and then to the crankshaft using a spring loaded gear.  This protects the blower gearing from sudden acceleration or deceleration.

Introduction of Different Blower

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The original blower developed by Willgoos and Mead came to be known as a ball bearing blower as it was supported by three ball bearings.  Pratt & Whitney later introduced a plain type blower which does not use ball bearings.  Many believe that the reason for the development of the plain type blower was due to weakness of the ball bearing blowers, but this is not the case, as both types of blowers have good and bad qualities.

Classified as a top-secret design when it was developed in the 1920’s, the R-1340 engine is still as much of a modern marvel today as it was almost 100 years ago, making it one of the aviation industry’s modern marvels.
Covington Aircraft has been overhauling, selling, and maintaining radial engines and turbine engines since 1979. If you need a radial engine part, perhaps for your R-1340, make sure you visit our website and give us a call! Happy Flying!

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Turbine Engines Education Series – Operational Considerations

All turbine engines have common operational considerations including engine temperature limits, hot starts, foreign object damage, compressor stall and flameout.  These potential problems are important to understand, especially in the turbine engine overhaul industry.

Engine Temperature Limitations

Turbine-Inlet

Turbine inlet temperature is where the highest temperature occurs in any turbine engine.  This makes the turbine inlet temperature the limiting factor in turbine engine operation.

Hot and Hung Starts

A hot start is when the exhaust gas temperature (EGT) exceeds the safe limit in a turbine engine.  This occurs when too much fuel vs. air enters the combustion chamber or when there is insufficient turbine r.p.m.  A hung start is when an engine fails to accelerate to proper speed or does not accelerate to a sufficient idle r.p.m.  This may be caused by insufficient battery power or fuel system component malfunction.

Foreign Object Damage

Debris ingestion is common among turbine engines due to the design and function of the air inlet.  Foreign Object Damage (FOD) normally consists of small nicks and dents when small objects on runways or taxiways are drawn into the engine by the air inlet.  This debris typically causes nicks and dents, but usually do not cause major damage.  However, bird strikes or ice ingestion can cause enough damage to a turbine engine that the entire engine can be destroyed.  For this reason, prevention of FOD is a high priority.

Compressor Stalls

The simple definition of a compressor stall is an imbalance between inlet velocity and compressor rotational speed.  When the compressor blade angle of attack exceeds the critical angle of attack, smooth airflow is interrupted and turbulence is created.  Compressor stalls can be intermittent or steady.  Recovery from a compressor stall must be accomplished quickly by reducing power, decreasing the airplane’s angle of attack and increasing airspeed.  Very subtle throttle changes are the order of the day!

Flameout

When the fire in a turbine engine goes out unintentionally, it is known as a flameout.  When an overly rich mixture causes the fuel temperature to drop below the combustion temperature, known as a rich flameout, it is normally caused by very fast engine acceleration.  Sometimes, flameout occurs due to low fuel pressure and low engine speeds especially in wet, cold weather coupled with air turbulence.

Thrust Variations

Turbine-Engine-2115119

Engine thrust varies with air density.  Turbine engines are affected by high relative humidity and as air density decreases so does thrust.  Turbine engines can experience a loss of thrust in high relative humidity.

Operational considerations must be understood when flying or working on turbine engines.  Knowing why an engine may have a hot start or what to do during a compressor stall is necessary for determining what needs to happen during aircraft maintenance.  Covington Aircraft, a leader in turbine engine overhaul, invites you to learn more about operational considerations at www.covingtonaircraft.com.

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Warbird Restoration Enthusiast and Aviation Experience of Clyde Zellers

Covington Aircraft believes that remembering and honoring the history of aviation is vital to our daily operation in Okmulgee, OK.  We highlight an important figure in Aviation, in this blog post, Clyde Zellers.

Clyde Zellers, certified as a private pilot at the age of seventeen, learned at the hands of renowned aircraft designer, Carl Unger.  Unger, who designed the “Breezy” experimental aircraft, helped Clyde build his experience with many different aircrafts, and helped to promote his love for refinishing and rebuilding airplanes.

North American SNJ-5

At the age of 23, Clyde purchased and restored his first aircraft, a 1943 North American SNJ-5 and used that plane to continue to practice formation and aerobatics.  He began a 40-year membership in the Civil Air Patrol and flew in his first air show in 1966.  In 1969, he began flying ex-military aircraft and began his WARBIRD restorations.

dafh-227Aircraft Experience

Within a year of starting with Britt Airways in Terre Haute in 1984, where he started flying Beech-99 Airliners and Swearingen Metroliners, Clyde was flying the much larger Fairchild FH-227 Friendship.  Clyde holds type ratings in eight different aircraft such as the Douglas DG-3 & AD-4N as well as the Beechcraft KingAir 350.  He teaches airplanes, single and multi engine piston powered aircraft as well as formation flying and aerobatics.

Second Aircraft Purchase

In 1997, Clyde purchased his second aircraft, a 1952 North American SNJ-5 and embarked on an eight month restoration process.  Clyde restored the plane with the unique and accurate paint scheme of Basic Training Unit Two, Corry Field, Pensacola Complex.  The SNJ aircraft was painted silver by spraying a mix of silver powder paste and a clear lacquer.

Clyde’s varied experience with many aircraft and his painstaking restoration of two SNJ planes, makes him a vital part of the aviation world.  Married to his understanding wife, Melinda, Clyde continues to fly in airshows using his two planes, and performing many of the aerobatics and formations he teaches.

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Radial Engine Expert: Alfred Harley

With 33 years of radial engine experience for Covington Aircraft, Alfred Harley is a respected and valued member of the Covington family.  His work ethic shines through in his dependability and reliability.  In addition, to his excellent work at Covington, Alfred has a rich and fulfilling life outside of work as well.

 

The Beginning

jetengine_radial_largeAfter graduating from Wilberton High School, Albert Harley went on to earn an automotive repair degree at OSU Okmulgee.  The shop foreman at Covington at the time, Ron Hollis, convinced Alfred to apply as Ron believed Alfred could put his mechanical skills to work better on aircraft than on autos.  Alfred began working at Covington in 1977, working on radial engines as he continues to do today.

Outstanding Work Ethic

 

Alfred is a dependable and experienced mechanic, responsible for many tasks including balancing crankshafts and impeller shafts, as well as final engine checks after test cell runs.  In the afternoons, he works in the stockrooms.  Alfred loves the Christian environment at Covington Aircraft and says that the Abbotts “make us feel we are part of the business and not just employees.”

Life Outside of Covington

alfred-649x1024Alfred loves to spend time with this three grown children, Jason, Aaron and Bethany as well as his two grandchildren.  A pastor at the Fundamental Indian Baptist Church in Okmulgee Oklahoma, keeps him busy in addition to his work at Covington.  Alfred is an avid fisherman and hunter.

Covington Aircraft is proud to call Alfred Harley a member of its family.  His outstanding work ethic, combined with his rich life outside the company, is an asset to Covington.  He is an excellent role model to any young person looking to enter the aviation mechanical field.

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Covington Aircraft’s Partnership with PT6A Engine Maker, Pratt & Whitney Canada

Covington Aircraft has been known for years in the agricultural community as a company that provides dependable, affordable PT6A engines and maintenance with high integrity and customer service. Now, under a new partnership with Pratt & Whitney Canada, Covington Aircraft will be able to bring that same type of service and commitment to the corporate world with the PT6 engine series.

For more information on Covington Aircraft, an aircraft maintenance company, visit http://www.covingtonaircraft.com

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The Global Reach of Covington Aircraft as an Aircraft Engine Repair & Maintenance Company

Covington Aircraft Has Global Reach
Covington Aircraft Has Global Reach

Aviation allows us the freedom to travel, the ability to pick up and fly to anywhere in the world we choose to go.   Add that option to the growing globalization forces, and you have increasing aircraft engine repair and aircraft engine maintenance done overseas.

At Covington Aircraft, we’re committed to helping our international customers in just the same way we would our neighbors down the street.  There are now more PT6A engines in international markets than there are in the United States, which adds up to more engine repair and overhaul needs for our international customers.  Since we do almost as much international business as we do domestic, we’ve made it a point of focus to be sure that Covington’s Core values will be represented to all of our customers.

Our Core Values:

Regardless of where you live in the world, Covington’s four core values; Integrity, Affordability, Dependability, and Quality Service, most likely matter to you.  These values transcend any one culture or locale.  We have people around the world flying aircraft powered by Covington engines, and we always treat our international customers with the same kind of care as our customers in the US.  Most recently we’ve worked with the German Airlines Lufthansa and Cessna Caravan on their aircraft maintenance needs abroad.

No International Rates

We offer the same great rates to our international customers as we do to our domestic partners. If we’ve quoted a customer a price and we find out that we were able to do the job at a lower price, we will charge the customer a lower price.  To us, it doesn’t matter if you are in Siberia or in suburbia, doing what’s right for our customers is what sets us apart from our competition. It’s a global world, and Covington is here to do right by our customers. Wherever you do business, you have to practice what you preach, and at Covington we always go above and beyond our customers’ expectations.

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