Category Archives: Turbine Engines

Proactive Turbine Engine Maintenance Is The Wave Of The Future In 2015 And Beyond

Proactive Turbine Engine Maintenance Is The Wave Of The Future In 2015 And BeyondMaintenance is without a doubt one of the most important aspects of making sure that an air fleet is safe, secure, and ready for the challenges of a demanding schedule. This is true of radial engine maintenance as well as today’s turbine engine maintenance. Continue reading Proactive Turbine Engine Maintenance Is The Wave Of The Future In 2015 And Beyond

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Common Turbine Engine Maintenance Mistakes Can Ground You For The Holidays

Common Turbine Engine Maintenance Mistakes Can Ground You For The HolidaysIt’s a fact: During the holidays, when people are thinking about heading home, you are more likely to run into maintenance issues or find that maintenance is taking longer than usual.

A holiday dip in productivity is normal across a whole range of industries, but it’s crucial to make sure that the ebb and flow of the calendar doesn’t result in any kind of safety issue. Continue reading Common Turbine Engine Maintenance Mistakes Can Ground You For The Holidays

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Looking For Turbine Engines For Sale? Turbine Versus Radial Engines Compared

Looking For Turbine Engines For Sale? Turbine Versus Radial Engines ComparedOne of the most important decisions you can make when it comes to aircraft engines is whether you will pursue turbines engines for sale or prefer radial engines for your aircraft.

As with a car or any other vehicle, the engine is the “beating heart” of the entire aircraft and will have enormous impact in terms of how it performs. Continue reading Looking For Turbine Engines For Sale? Turbine Versus Radial Engines Compared

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Understanding The Operation Of A Gas Turbine Engine

Understanding The Operation Of A Gas Turbine EngineAn airplane is truly a modern marvel. A couple of centuries ago, flight was the stuff of dreams – until that famous flight at Kitty Hawk. Today’s aircrafts are the culmination of years of research, engineering, and development. They rely on a lot of different components including wings, bodies, navigation instruments, and more, but behind it all is the engine that powers the aircraft and propels it forwards. Continue reading Understanding The Operation Of A Gas Turbine Engine

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Why An Authorized MRO Is The Right MRO To Turn To

Why An Authorized MRO Is The Right MRO To Turn ToKeeping an aircraft in the air is a big job, and it goes far beyond just the pilot in the cockpit. Just like any other machine, an aircraft requires a lot of care, maintenance, and occasionally a repair job in order to keep it ready to fly. While most fleets will have some of their own maintenance technicians on hand, at some point you’ll have to consider the use of an MRO to help you.

There are plenty of different reasons that you’ll need to trust an MRO – from jobs that are too large for your team to the simple fact that you have too much work to handle at once. However, knowing when the time is right for an MRO’s assistance isn’t usually as difficult as knowing which one to turn to. Continue reading Why An Authorized MRO Is The Right MRO To Turn To

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Understanding How A Turbine Engine Works

Understanding How A Turbine Engine WorksWhile plenty of smaller aircraft today are still equipped with the reliable radial engines, it’s turbine engines that have really changed the aircraft industry over the last few decades. These engines have become the standard for most aviation machines, and taking a few minutes to understand more about how they work is always a good idea if you own an aircraft equipped with one. Continue reading Understanding How A Turbine Engine Works

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The Key Differences Between Radial And Turbine Engines

The Key Differences Between Radial And Turbine EnginesIn the aviation field, technology and industry has helped to move the field forward over the years. This is incredibly obvious when you take a look at the different types of aircraft engines in use today and throughout history. From piston engines to modern jet engines, there are numerous choices out there. For those who have smaller or mid-sized planes, huge jet engines probably aren’t a viable option. Instead, the choice will often come down to either a radial or turbine engine. But understanding more about these two options is important when you need to choose. Here’s a quick look at some of the basics about each and how they differ.

Continue reading The Key Differences Between Radial And Turbine Engines

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The Differences Between Radial And Turbine Engines

The Differences Between Radial And Turbine EnginesThe field of aviation has changed tremendously over the last century. Today, many aircraft owners have decided to purchase the smaller ‘mini-jets’ that are on the market. But a huge number of aviation enthusiasts still appreciate what older style turbine or radial engines can offer to them. These two types of engines have evolved over the years as well, and today’s engines offer great reliability, power, performance, and fuel efficiency and can hold their own with pretty much any engine out there.

Continue reading The Differences Between Radial And Turbine Engines

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Agricultural Planes & Turbine Aircraft Engines: A Match Made In Heaven

Af Planes and Turbine EnginesAgriculture planes are an integral part of the United States. The country has moved toward growing massive amounts of food per farm all across the country. These plots of land need to be seeded, fertilized and sprayed with pesticide in order for the farm to make food for the masses. The upkeep of huge plots of farm land can cost tens of thousands of dollars per year. As farmers and agricultural businesses try to turn a profit, they look for more creative ways to save money on the upkeep of their land. Continue reading Agricultural Planes & Turbine Aircraft Engines: A Match Made In Heaven

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PT6 Celebrates Fifty Years Part 1

When it was developed in 1963, the PT6 was the first turboprop engine rated at 450 shaft horsepower, impressing Beechcraft to the point that the company chose to install the engine in their King Air line of turboprop twins.  Fast-forward 50 years, and Beechcraft still choose the PT6, although of ever-increasing power ratings, to power their engines.

 Before The PT6

beechcraftPratt & Whitney began development of the PT6 in the late 1950’s in an attempt to replace the manufacturer’s Wasp radial engines, developed during in the 1930’s.  In 1925, Frederick Rentschler, President of Wright Aeronautical, approached his brother, Gordon, and Edward Deeds, who were both on the board of Niles Bement Pond, convincing them that Pratt & Whitney Machine Tool, a subsidiary of Niles, should fund the creation of a new aircraft engine Rentschler and a colleage, George Mead, were developing.  The engine was to be a large, air-cooled radial design.  The executives at Pratt & Whitney saw an opportunity for growth and lent Rentschler $250,000, the use of the Pratt & Whitney name and space in their building to begin creating the new engine.  Rentschler left Wright Aeronautical and took over operations of Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Division, The first of the Wasp series debuted on December 24, 1925, quickly becoming one of the most widely used aircraft engines in the industry due to their superior speed, rate of climb and reliability.  Charles Lindbergh and Ameila Earhart both set records in Wasp-powered aircraft.

Wasp to Hornet

 With the development of the PT6 still a few decades away, Pratt & Whitney created the next line of radial engines, the Hornet, rated at 525 horsepower.  The dependability of both the Wasp and the Hornet made them very popular among commercial aircraft, and as the public use of air travel increased, so did the demand for Pratt & Whitney engines.  As it became apparent that the United States would enter World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt called on manufacturers to produce 50,000 aircraft a year for military use, requiring Pratt & Whitney to expand its workforce from 3,000 to 40,000.  Throughout the war, Pratt & Whitney continued to innovate, until, by the end of the war, their largest engine provided 3,600 horsepower.  However, radial engines were slowly being replaced by lighter turboprop engines.

Vision of the PT6

In 1957, Pratt & Whitney saw an opportunity to channel profits from the piston engine spare parts business to the development of smaller gas turbine engines than those currently being manufactured in the United States. The company gathered a team of 12 young engineers after conducting market studies that found there was a need for a 500 shaft horsepower engine that could replace piston engines, such as the Wasp and Hornet.  In December 1963, Pratt & Whitney shipped the first of the PT6 series, the PT6A-6, a highly innovative gas turbine representing technology advances that were significant at the time.  Because gas turbines have a higher power to weight ratio than piston engines, the PT6 was perfect for aviation engines.

pt6aThe PT6 has enjoyed a rich and colorful history since it began production in 1963, and Pratt & Whitney is proud to celebrate the 50th anniversary of this timeless aircraft engine.  Learn more about the colorful past, pioneers who flew this engine and continuing evolution of an engine ahead of its time.  For more information on the PT6 or about aircraft maintenance, contact Covington Aircraft online or by telephone today.

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