Category Archives: PT6A

Piper M600 Achieves Australian Certification

VERO BEACH, Fla., December 12, 2016 – Piper Aircraft, Inc. was granted a type certification for its top-of-the-line, single-engine M600 by Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) on September 20, 2016, paving the way for the launch of flights by owner operators in the region.
“This is a significant milestone for the Piper M600,” said Piper Aircraft CEO Simon Caldecott. “Australian owner/operators have shown great interest in the range and safety proposition offered by the M600 equipped with the Garmin G3000 avionics suite, the most sophisticated in the class. Operators tell us they are very keen on the greater range and enhanced safety features they say makes the 600 the best value in the class.”
About M600
 
The M600, the most advanced and capable aircraft in Piper’s M-class line up, seats six and is powered by Pratt & Whitney PT6A-42A turboprop engine flat rated at 600 SHP. The aircraft has a maximum speed of 274 ktas / 507 km/h at maximum available power. The M600 features the most sophisticated general aviation avionics suite available from Garmin. The Garmin G3000 offers industry-leading intuitiveness and powerful avionics capabilities. Innovative pilot interface design allows for easy and efficient flight deck management, increasing safety margins and reducing pilot workload. Ergonomically crafted for the pilot, control of radios, audio and intercom channels, transponder codes, charts, mapping, flight plan entry and system set up have been greatly simplified with the Garmin GTC 570 touchscreen controller. The dual GTC 570s provide a centralized point of access for the majority of all avionics tuning, selection and data inputs. The M600 has enhanced safety features including Emergency Descent Mode, Electronic Stability Protection, Level Model and Underspeed / Overspeed Protection.
 12.30.2016PiperM600
The aesthetics, ergonomics and technologies of the new Piper M600 aircraft redefine comfort and convenience. The M600 interior features newly styled seats, which have been optimized for comfort, as well as enhanced side panels with improved passenger interface. Additionally, three new color palettes have thoughtfully been created with the customer in mind. A comprehensive survey process helped identify the features and attributes that would be most appreciated by both pilots and customers including USB charging ports, executive folding tables, and folding seats.
The 2016 M600 is listed at a competitive price of $2.853 million.
About Piper Aircraft
 
Piper Aircraft Inc., headquartered in Vero Beach, Fla., offers aviators throughout the world efficient and reliable single- and twin-engine aircraft. The single-engine M-Class series – the M600, M500, M350 and Matrix – offers businesses and individuals elegant performance and value. The Twin Class Seneca V and Seminole balance proven performance, efficiency, and simplicity in twin-engine aircraft. The Trainer Class Warrior, Archer TX, Archer DX, Arrow, Seminole and Seneca V aircraft form the most complete technically-advanced line of pilot training aircraft in the world. All Piper airplanes feature advanced Garmin avionics in the cockpit. Piper is a member of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association.

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Turbine Conversions selects PT6A-21 engines for Cessna 206 conversion

Turbine Conversions, Ltd. and Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) have signed a long-term contract for the sale of PT6A-21 engines to power the recently announced Cessna 206 turbine conversion. P&WC is a subsidiary of United Technologies Corp.

Turbine Conversions has been converting aircraft using P&WC engines since 1990, but company president Bill Hatfield first encountered the PT6 engine when he installed a PT6A-34AG engine in his Grumman Ag Cat in 1975.

“I still fly my Grumman Ag Cat, and that PT6A-34AG engine continues to serve me well after more than 40 years,” said Hatfield, one of the most respected and well-known pioneers of the agricultural industry. “The relationships I have built with P&WC employees over the years have likewise endured and helped empower our business and those of our own clients. We are delighted to have struck yet another arrangement with P&WC to power our Cessna 206 conversion.”

“Turbine Conversions has consistently demonstrated its understanding of the factors that drive successful conversion programs,” said Denis Parisien, vice-president, General Aviation, P&WC. “With the 206 turbine conversion program, our PT6A-21 engines will replace piston engines so operators of the converted aircraft will benefit from a considerable increase in power, better hot and high performance and a TBO [time between overhaul] of 3,600 hours. Combined with that is our OEM [original equipment manufacturer] warranty and a global customer support network that is second to none.”

cessna 206

The PT6A engine boasts powerful performance and unmatched versatility. PT6 technology has powered 125 different applications since its introduction. More than 46,000 PT6 engines have been manufactured, with 23,000 now in service. The engine has logged more than 375 million flight hours.

“Anyone can say they’re the best; we have the numbers to prove it,” said Parisien. “It’s more than an engine. The PT6A engine offers the best of both worlds: Its proven technology is built upon a remarkable body of engineering achievement that has written new chapters in aviation history in collaboration with our customers, and it’s also this technology that continues to make new aircraft applications possible. We’re already moving on to the next innovation.”

The PT6A engine’s flexible architecture and modular reverse-flow design simplify installation in both single- and twin-engine installations as well as tractor and pusher propeller configurations. Simple on-wing maintenance is possible for most tasks, whereas other engines might need a shop visit.

H/T Skies Magazine.

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Beechcraft Beefs Up King Air 350 Performance

Beechcraft today announced the introduction of the Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-67A engines to boost performance for its King Air 350HW and 350ER twin turboprops. The Textron subsidiary also is now offering an increased maximum takeoff weight of 17,500 pounds for the two models.

Both modifications are now approved by the U.S. FAA and EASA and are available as factory options for new aircraft, or as retrofits. The work can be done by any of Textron’s 19 company-owned authorized service centers.

KingAir350

The King Air 350 platform is renowned as a worldwide mission enabler and these optional enhancements will offer customers added performance and payload for special mission operations,” said Bob Gibbs, Beechcraft’s vice president of special mission aircraft. “We have successfully modified a fleet of NATO air force-operated King Air 350ER aircraft with these upgrades, and we are excited to offer these options to provide more value to our special mission customers.”

The more powerful PT6A-67A engines provide superior takeoff and climb performance, including hot and high operations. With an outside air temperature of 50-deg C (122-deg F), the engine upgrade allows for a maximum takeoff gross weight increase of up to 2,700 pounds at sea level, compared to the standard aircraft. The increased gross weight option provides operators greater flexibility between payload and fuel, representing a potential increase in loiter time of two to three hours.

The 350HW is the heavyweight version of the King Air 350, providing increased load-carrying capability thanks to its larger and stronger main landing gear struts, wheels, tires and brakes. The 350ER is the extended-range version with more fuel capacity through the addition of low drag metal fuel tanks aft of the powerplant. With NBAAIFR fuel reserves, its max ferry range is 2,690 nautical miles (4,982 kilometers), and it can also offer an endurance time of 12 hours for surveillance missions.

Beechcraft (Stand A21) also is promoting its Grand Caravan turboprop single for special missions work, billing it as a sound value proposition for a variety of operators thanks to its low operating and acquisition costs. “In the Middle East at large we [Textron] have nearly 150 [Citation] business jets and 160 turboprops, and about half of the turboprops are being used for special missions work, including surveillance,” Gibbs told AIN.

The Caravan can carry between 10 and 12 passengers or a mix of equipment for multi-role operations including medical evacuation. It offers range of up to around 1,000 nm (1,852 km).

The aircraft is very maintainable; with no pressurization or hydraulics, it is a very simple aircraft and has a low fuel burn of around 65 gallons per hour at cruise. That’s about one-fifth of [the fuel burn] of a light helicopter,” Gibbs explained. “The basic aircraft, which has an endurance of around six to seven hours on station, costs under $3 million, or between $4 million and $6 million equipped.

Both the Caravan and the King Air 350 can operate from rough strips. The examples on display here at the MEBAA show are the Grand Caravan EX model and the King Air 350i.

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Viking Air Brings 100th Twin Otter to NBAA 2016

Viking Air celebrated the production of its 100th Series 400 Twin Otter in Calgary this past summer, and is showing the aircraft, replete with seaplane floats and executive interior, on the NBAA 2016 static line.

Viking showed the prototype Series 400 here in Orlando in 2008. “It’s been a long tradition,” Viking Air president and CEO David Curtis told ShowNews. “We like to put it in front of all those white jets and show off something different.”

12-1-2016vikingtwinotter400

The 100th, s.n. 944, is operated as a factory demonstrator by Viking’s sister company, Victoria, B.C.-based Pacific Sky Aviation. Pacific Sky also provides Twin Otter training, in support of which it’s installed a new Level D simulator, also in Calgary. The new unit by Textron-owned TRU Simulation + Training (Montreal) is the first in the world to feature a seaplane configuration, Viking says.

Viking holds the type certificates for all out-of-production de Havilland Canada aircraft, from the DHC-1 Chipmunk through the DHC-7 Dash-7 50-passenger STOL regional airliner. The Twin Otter was introduced as the DHC-6 in 1965.

Viking acquired the de Havilland type certificates in February 2006. The decision to launch the Series 400, the company says, “was made after a market study, supported by the worldwide Twin Otter operator group, revealed a strong demand for the new platform to replace the aging legacy fleet.” The Series 400 was formally launched in March 2007, and the first production aircraft flew in February 2010. Transport Canada issued the Series 400 type certificate that June. Aircraft have since been delivered in nearly 30 countries.

“The Series 400 is an all-new airplane,” says Curtis. Viking collaborator (and competitor) Ikhana, he notes, continues to convert legacy Twin Otters. Ikhana provides service and support for Viking-built aircraft too, and in fact did the VIP interior for the aircraft on display here today.

Viking’s Series 400 Twin Otter is available with standard landing gear, straight or amphibious floats, skis, wheel skis, or IFG/intermediate flotation gear – with multiple quick-change interior configurations available. “The Series 400 Twin Otter is a versatile aircraft that can be utilized for multiple roles, such as regional commuter, environmental monitoring, parachute operations, cargo and infrastructure support, corporate shuttle, and personal use,” the company says.

“We build a new Twin Otter every 15 days,” Curtis notes, adding that the current backlog is about 15 months. He says the number flying passengers is difficult to pinpoint, as interiors can be readily changed to suit the mission – an attraction for numerous customers.

“When I take a moment to reflect on the Series 400 program from the original launch to completion of our 100th aircraft, and all the challenges we have overcome in between, I am truly amazed at what the Viking team has accomplished,” Curtis said this past summer. “While there was doubt that a relatively unknown aerospace manufacturing company on the west coast of Canada would be up to the task, here we are, 100 production aircraft later.”

The $6.9 million Series 400 Twin Otter is powered by upgraded Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-34 engines, and features a fully integrated Honeywell Primus Apex digital avionics suite. Viking has fitted its modernized Twin Otter with internal and external LED lighting, “and approximately 800 other modifications incorporated to improve upon the original production model.”

Viking is now offering a “Phase II” avionics upgrade including Honeywell digital autopilot, TCAS II, and ADS/B capabilities.

And, for operators flying shorter VFR missions, Viking is promoting 400S (with floats) and 400L (with wheels) aircraft, priced at $5.995 million with PT6A-27 engines. They are about 400 pounds lighter than the standard Series 400 Twin Otter. Bleed air heating and cooling is absent, and there is a more modest avionics package.

“They don’t need a full suite in what to them is a pick-up truck,” Curtis says.

H/T Aviation Week.

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questkodiak_featured

Quest secures record order for Kodiak Powered by PT6A

Quest Aircraft has secured an order from Japanese start-up operator Sky Trek for 20 Kodiak single-engined turboprops. The deal with the membership-based charter provider was announced on 15 November, and marks the largest single order to date for the high-wing, all-metal type.

The first Kodiak was shipped to the Toyko-based Sky Trek in late October and the remaining units will be delivered over the coming 12 months.

Quest – owned by Japanese companies Setouchi Holdings and Mitsui – says Sky Trek was launched on 7 November and plans to begin charter services in the first half of 2017, offering membership-based programmes to private individuals and corporations.

“The Kodiak is extremely well-suited for use in Japan, where the topography and private transportation infrastructure can be challenging,” says Quest, referring to the aircraft’s short take-off and landing performance and multi-mission capability.

“The Kodiak can take off in under 1,000ft [745m] at full gross take-off weight of 7,255lb [3,290kg] and climb at over 1,300 feet per minute,” the company adds. “With powerful [Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-34] turbine performance, the Kodiak has the ability to land and take-off from unimproved surfaces and is capable of working off floats without structural upgrades.”

questkodiak

Flight Fleets Analyzer records a global fleet of more than 190 Kodiaks, the first having entered service in 2007. The Sandpoint, Idaho-based company shipped 23 examples in the first nine months of 2016, and Quest says it will pass the 200-unit delivery milestone by the end of the year.

Heard thru Flightglobal.com.

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pt6-a engine

Pratt & Whitney Canada Innovates Pay-Per-Hour Maintenance with the Launch of New Coverage Program

ESP®ecially for Your PT6 engine and new engine ESP plans: Enrolling today

ORLANDO, FLORIDA–(Marketwired – Oct. 27, 2016) – With more than 10,000 engines already enrolled in its pay-per-hour maintenance plans, Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) is once again raising the bar with the introduction of a leading-edge Eagle Service Plan™ (ESP) maintenance program tailored to PT6A customers, as well as a major enhancement to its current ESP plan offering. Each maintenance plan optimizes aircraft availability and performance while protecting and enhancing the value of the aircraft investment. P&WC is a subsidiary of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX).

The ESP plan is a simple, cost-effective pay-per-hour engine coverage program that provides long-term costs and ensures a planned and preventative approach to maintenance. Being launched are: ESPecially for Your PT6 engine, which provides the first 400 hours of coverage for free to customers of new PT6A engine-powered aircraft; and an enhancement to P&WC’s current ESP plan offering, which enables customers to apply their ESP plan investment toward a new engine of the same model or a new engine conversion at time of overhaul.

“We continue to push ourselves to think outside of the box – about how we best serve our customers as well as deliver the greatest value and return on investment,” said Satheeshkumar Kumarasingam, Vice President of Commercial Services. “We’ve proven the bottom-line value of the ESP plan to thousands of customers as a unique solution that delivers a planned approach to OEM-backed engine maintenance. And we continue to innovate our maintenance coverage options with the launch of new and enhanced programs. Today’s announcement is a testament to the program’s ongoing evolution in delivering comprehensive pay-per-hour coverage.”

ESPecially for Your PT6 engine plan: First 400-hours of coverage at no cost

This past July, P&WC introduced the ESPecially for Your PT6 engine plan to aircraft OEMs as a way to support new aircraft sales and deliver optimal value to customers of new PT6A engine-powered aircraft. The plan includes P&WC’s world class ESP program with the first 400 hours of engine coverage at no cost to customers, representing a value of up to $50,000 per engine toward future maintenance. Additionally, after the first 400 hours of no-cost coverage customers will receive a reduced ESP plan rate until their first overhaul.

kodiak pt6a

“In three months since we launched ESPecially for Your PT6 engine plan, the enrollment in the program has been outstanding,” said Kumarasingam. “With the PT6A engine, we’re delivering innovative hardware and responsive care – . In fact, we’re seeing interest from aircraft OEMs to incorporate ESPecially for Your PT6 engine plan into their own maintenance packages to offer the most comprehensive ‘tip-to-tail’ aircraft coverage.”

New Engine ESP Plan Option: Apply your ESP investment toward a new engine or new engine conversion at Time of Overhaul

For customers already enrolled in an ESP plan and contributing on a per-flying-hour basis, P&WC has enhanced the plan to allow customers to select a new engine of the same model or a new engine conversion upgrade at time of overhaul for an additional cost.

“Exceptionally simple and flexible, this ESP plan enhancement is applicable on all active P&WC engine programs and gives our customers the ability to choose how their investment in ESP pay-per-hour plan coverage is applied at the time of overhaul,” continued Kumarasingam. “In addition to a higher residual value and/or a performance upgrade, customers will have all of the advantages that come with a new engine – from first run warranty and a parts service policy in full, to improved aircraft resale value.”

About the Eagle Service Plan

Simple to use yet comprehensive, P&WC’s ESP plan is an engine maintenance service plan for which operators pay a fixed monthly fee based on engine hours flown. For all ESP programs, plan members simply select the level of coverage that best fits their operation and pay an hourly rate based on the number of hours flown each month. All coverage levels include:

  • Engine overhaul/refurbishment
  • Hot Section Inspection/refurbishment
  • Basic unscheduled engine maintenance
  • Basic unscheduled accessories repair
  • Recommended product support improvements at engine shop visits
  • Rental engine support

Visit us at NBAA BACE, booth 3239. Interested operators customers are invited to stop by the P&WC booth to speak with a customer service representative.

About Pratt & Whitney Canada

Founded in 1928, and a global leader in aerospace, P&WC is shaping the future of aviation with dependable, high-technology engines. Based in Longueuil, Quebec (Canada), P&WC is a wholly owned subsidiary of United Technologies Corp. based in Farmington, Connecticut, provides high-technology systems and services to the global aerospace and building systems industries.

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Aviation Safety: Making Sure You’re Aware of Lancair Mishaps

The Lancair experimental aircraft: beautiful, fast and having what the FAA calls a “disproportionate” number of fatal accidents. There seem to be a higher number of fatal accidents involving Lancairs, which can be powered by the PT6APT6A. We want you to be aware of some statistics and information.

Continue reading Aviation Safety: Making Sure You’re Aware of Lancair Mishaps

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Why You NEED to Know EDD – Electrostatic Discharge Damage in the PT6A

Last month we disassembled and investigated a 3000 hour time since new PT6A-34AG engine with a #1 bearing failure that appears to be attributable to a phenomenon called: EDD! The damage from the failure combined with damage from the propeller sudden stoppage following the aircraft’s off airport landing has resulted in a BER; an engine that is “Beyond Economic Repair”!

Continue reading Why You NEED to Know EDD – Electrostatic Discharge Damage in the PT6A

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