Category Archives: PT6A

A Look at the Pilatus PC-7 Turbo Trainer

The two-seat light trainer aircraft Pilatus PC-7 turbo was built by Pilatus Aircraft in Switzerland. It can perform various functions, including aerobatics and tactical and night flying.

The PC-7 can accommodate a crew of two members (a student and trainer) and has six underwing hardpoints.

Selected by 20 air forces to train military pilots, the aircraft is fully operational in civil and military pilot training bases worldwide, and is equipped with a single Pratt and Whitney PT6A-25A turboprop engine.

The first series of the aircraft was delivered to the Myanmar Air Force in 1979. It also received Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Federal Office of Civil Aviation (FOCA) certifications for European and US regulations.

PC-7 orders and deliveries

More than 500 PC-7 and PC-7 MkII aircraft have been sold to 21 countries. Mexico purchased 88 PC-7s, deliveries of which began in 1980, while approximately 52 PC-7s were bought by Iraq, with deliveries beginning in 1980. However, the Iraqi fleet was destroyed during the US invasion in 2003. Malaysia acquired 44, deliveries of which began in 1983.

PC-7 development

The PC-7 was derived from the Pilatus P-3 training aircraft, which was launched in the early 1950s.

A P-3 prototype first flew on 12 April 1966, but the PC-7 development programme was delayed when the prototype crashed due to forced landing.

In 1973, the programme resumed using a modified engine and the new aircraft was named PC-7. The prototype completed its maiden flight on 12 May 1975, followed by a fully produced PC-7 on 19 August 1978.

Variants of PC-7 aircraft

The PC-7 has two variants: PC-7 MkII and NCPC-7. The PC-7 MkII variant is also known as the Astra, and was developed because of South Africa’s requirement for an advanced version of the PC-7.

MkII was derived from the PC-9 M aircraft and the M denotes the aircraft’s modular features. The PC-9 M aircraft is powered by a Pratt and Whitney PT6A-62 turboprop engine, which provides 863kW of output power.

This is equipped with advanced avionics and an onboard oxygen generation system (OBOGS). The PC-7 MkII aircraft consists of two underwing hardpoints, compared to the PC-7’s six.

The first PC-7 MkII had its maiden flight in August 1994 and the first delivery of was made to the South African Air Force (SAAF) in November 1994. In total, 60 were delivered to the SAAF by 1996.

The SAAF’s 35 Pilatus Astra PC-7MkII aircraft were upgraded with advanced glass cockpit components by removing the disused avionics systems, under a contract signed with Pilatus Aircraft in 2009. This also included incorporating two new flight training devices, ground based training systems and spares.


Payerne, Switzerland – August 31, 2014: Swiss Air Force PC-7 display team flying Pilatus PC-7 trainer aircraft. 

PC-7 MkII maiden flight and orders

Upgrades of the first aircraft were carried out at the Pilatus facility in Switzerland during 2009. The maiden flight of the first upgraded PC-7 MkII aircraft took place on 23 September of the same year.

Aerosud, with assistance from Pilatus field service engineers, undertook the modernisation of the remaining MkII fleet at Langebaanweg Air Force Base in South Africa.

In December 2010, Malaysia unveiled plans to procure 12 additional PC-7 MkII trainers in two batches by selling its older aircraft to the Philippines. It is currently operating 17 of 19 aircraft, as two were destroyed in accidents.

Pilatus Aircraft was awarded a BWP40m contract by the Botswana Defence Force (BDF) in April 2011 to supply five PC-7 MkII trainers to replace its PC-7 fleet, which has been in service since 1990. The contract also covers a ground base training system, spare parts and support equipment..

The NCPC-7 was developed by upgrading the standard PC-7. New features include a glass cockpit, GPS, autopilot and a second VHF radio. It was developed for the Swiss Air Force for training pilots.

In total, 18 PC-7 aircraft were upgraded to NCPC-7 and a contract for upgrading ten more was signed in February 2008.

Cockpit and avionics

The PC-7 MkII features a dual glass cockpit and is equipped with primary flight display (PFD), secondary flight display (SFD) and secondary instruments display panel (ESDP), as well as an audio radio management system (ARMS).

In addition, it includes very-high frequency communication (VHF COM) 1, VHF COM 2, ultra-high frequency communication UHF COM, VHF NAV 1, VHF NAV 2, distance measuring equipment (DME) and automatic direction finders (ADF).

A mode S transponder, GPS, radar altimeter, attitude heading reference system (AHRS), emergency locator beacon (ELT) and air data computer avionics are also installed in the cockpit.

Performance and cruise speed

The PC-7 can climb at a rate of 865m per minute. It has a cruise speed of 415km/h and can fly at 460km/h. The range and service ceiling are 1,950km and 9,150m, respectively.

Take-off and landing distances are 590m and 625m, respectively, while the maximum g-load capacity is -3 / +6 and maximum take-off weight is 2,700kg.

Turboprop engine

The Pilatus PC-7 is powered by a single Pratt & Whitney PT6A-25A turboprop engine and a three-blade Hartzell HC-B3TN-2 propeller. It can generate 485kW of output power.

The PT6A-25A is a two-shaft engine with a multi-stage compressor driven by a single-stage compressor turbine. It has another independent shaft coupling the power turbine and propeller through an epicyclic concentric reduction gearbox.

A single 522.2kW Pratt and Whitney PT6A-25C turboprop engine powers the PC-7 MkII. This offers a lower engine operating cost than the PC-7 engine.

The main difference between the engines used in the PC-7 and the MkII variant is the output capacities.

Meanwhile, the NCPC-7 has a single Pratt & Whitney PT6A-25A turboprop engine, similar to that used in the standard PC-7 aircraft.

Post from https://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/pilatus_pc-7/

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Cessna SkyCourier development progresses with prototype assembly underway

Textron Aviation Inc has announced new milestones in its Cessna SkyCourier twin utility turboprop development program, with assembly underway for the prototype aircraft and the additional five flight and ground test articles. Component testing also continues for the new propeller, nose landing gear, and fuel system.

“When we began designing and developing the Cessna SkyCourier, we engaged a number of mission-centric customers for technical input to best meet their unique needs in one platform,” said Chris Hearne, senior vice president, Engineering.

“We are building this aircraft with the flexibility and reliability needed for a variety of high-utilization operations including cargo, passenger or special missions and we are excited that the customers and the market are responding positively to its capabilities.”

Endurance and functional testing for the new McCauley 110-inch propeller consists of nearly 150 hours of operation and includes a variety of simulated flight profiles. The propeller is mated with the proven PWC PT6A-65B, 1100-shp engine, mounted on a test stand. Simultaneously, assembly of the fuel system test article and nose landing gear drop test article is underway, with testing to start later this month.

The Cessna SkyCourier is the latest clean-sheet design from Textron Aviation and will be offered in various configurations including cargo, passenger or a combination of both, all based on a common platform to meet the needs of a wide range of customers.

The cargo configuration is designed to accommodate three standard air cargo containers (LD3) with a payload of up to 6,000 pounds while the passenger version carries up to 19 passengers.

FedEx Express, the world’s largest express transportation company and longtime Textron Aviation customer, signed on as the launch customer in late 2017 for up to 100 aircraft, with an initial fleet order of 50 cargo aircraft and options for 50 more.


Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Mike Patey’s DRACO – The Coolest STOL Aircraft Ever

What happens when you put the legendary Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A on one of the most versatile of all bush planes? Mike Patey’s Draco, that’s what. And, woah, is it a BEAST!

The race-winning STOL aircraft is the winner of the 2018 High Sierra STOL Drag competition.

Brainchild of self-taught engineer and successful entrepreneur Mike Patey, Draco is the ultimate backcountry airplane. With its bright red skin, tall legs and heavy cloud of dust around it, Draco commands attention everywhere it lands. If you don’t happen to see it, you hear it; it’s one of the few bush planes with a turbine engine and reverse thrust, and the whine of the turboprop comes unexpectedly to unsuspecting observers.

Mike Patey’s DRACO at the Great Alaskan Aviation Gathering.

Mike Patey put a PT6A-28 680 shaft horsepower and 102” four bladed prop on the front of the last Wilga ever built. With an empty weight of 2400 lbs and a typical flying weight of 3000 lbs, Mike can be off the ground in about 120 feet, pitch to 30 degrees and maintain 4,000 feet per minute… while accelerating 50+ mph by 1,000 feet! He designed a completely new airfoil that dropped the stall speed about 20 mph to about 37 mph.

What’s even crazier is he uses about 300 HP of reverse to bring it to a stop in 150 feet but says that number will decrease once he gets more than a week of flying it under his belt. Also, it has oxygen and can go to 28,000 feet at 200 knots TAS at 28 gph at half power for Vne constraints. (Source: @super_cubbin)

If you haven’t seen the Draco, we highly encourage you to check out this amazing video from Trent Palmer below.

Sourced from Hangar.Flights.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Daher introduced turboprop business jet TBM 940

The French aircraft manufacturer Daher presented the next iteration of high-speed single-engine turboprop aircraft of the business class of the popular line TBM 900. 28 years after the start of production of the first generation of airplanes – the TBM 700, the aircraft family was replenished with a new member – the TBM 940.

Continue reading Daher introduced turboprop business jet TBM 940

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

[VIDEO] Blackhawk: The World’s Fastest King Air

The Blackhawk-upgraded King Air 350 features Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-67A engines, producing 1,050 SHP up to 25,000 feet, while stock King Air 350 engines begin losing horsepower at 15,000 feet. Paired with two 5-blade natural composite MT Propellers with spinners, the complete upgrade transforms your Super King Air into a real Super Hero.

Via FlyingMag.com

“This truly is the Greatest King Air that I have yet had the pleasure to operate.”
Renowned flight instructor and author of “The King Air Book” Tom Clements after flying an XP67A-powered King Air 350.

Program updates:

  • G1000 NXi compatibility is approved and a number of installations are underway!
  • Going to the King Air Gathering in Fredericksburg, Tx September 27-29? We’ll be there along with an upgraded 350! More info can be found here: http://www.kingairgathering.com/
  • EAA Airventure at Oshkosh was a great success with the launch of the King Air 300 program and strong interest in the 350 we had on display which is now sold.
  • Want to hear directly from operators that are flying the XP67A? Contact me and I can provide you a full contact list for the aircraft that are flying it!
  • Wondering about resale value? 7 of our first 20 conversions have been done by aircraft brokers upgrading because it increased the value of the aircraft!
  • Pratt & Whitney was recently able to accelerate deliveries so we currently have engines available, contact us to ensure we have engines available to meet your schedule.

Via Blackhawk.aero.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Why Engine Condition Trend Monitoring is a Must for PT6As

This article originally appeared on the P&WC Airtime Blog.

Whether it involves recording and inputting data manually or using the latest automated Digital Engine Services, Engine Condition Trend Monitoring delivers net gains for all PT6A customers.

A WORTHWHILE PAYOFF

Rob Winchcomb, PT6A Customer Manager, is the first to admit that doing Engine Condition Trend Monitoring (ECTM) by hand is a hassle.

It requires writing down key engine and aircraft data at a set time during each flight once the plane is at a stable cruising speed, inputting the recorded figures into a computer after landing and sending them to the analysis company for comparison with the results of previous flights.

For busy operators who already have plenty on their plate during a flight, the extra work might seem like an unnecessary nuisance. That’s why Rob’s customers always ask him the same question: “What’s in it for me?”

He’s been telling them the same thing for 25 years: “ECTM reduces the cost of ownership, increases the engine’s availability and gives you more peace of mind.”

The Royal Flying Doctor Service’s PT6A Powered Beechcraft Kingair 350.

Rob walks the talk. Thirty years ago, before joining P&WC, he was on the other side of the fence as a customer, began his aviation career with the Royal Flying Doctor Service and working for other regional airlines in Australia. Back then, he was already a strong proponent for recording and using engine condition data, despite having to do it all the hard way—computing the trend values by hand on a Texas Instruments calculator and plotting his own handmade ECTM graphs.

A LITTLE EFFORT, A LOT GAINED

“PT6A engines are very reliable from one inspection to the next, but in my mind the question is, why not take the next step? With ECTM, you can optimize performance and maintenance planning,” says Rob. “It doesn’t cost you much considering the gains it will bring.”

By analyzing parameters such as power, speed and fuel flow on a flight-to-flight basis, ECTM can identify subtle changes in an engine’s performance. Based on the analysis results, P&WC’s engine health monitoring partner CAMP Systems will let the operator and maintenance team know if any actions are required.

Is a sudden 10-degree increase in temperature simply the result of replacing a fuel nozzle set? Is an increased power load due to excess air leaking from the cabin rather than an issue with the engine itself? Do you need to take a look at the compressor? ECTM will tell you.

This kind of detailed insight into engine performance means that issues can be detected and resolved before they turn into costly repairs and affect operation. It also makes it easier for PT6A customers to move to on-condition hot section inspections.

It all adds up to better maintenance planning, lower expenses and increased engine availability.

There’s also a financial benefit when selling a used aircraft. If you’ve been consistently performing ECTM, you’ll have a record to show potential buyers that the engine is well maintained. That will give them more confidence, which in turn enhances your aircraft’s resale value.

AUTOMATED ECTM AND MORE WITH THE FAST™ SOLUTION

Today, many operators can enjoy all the advantages of ECTM with none of the downsides, thanks to P&WC’s FAST™ Solution for proactive engine health management system.

Now available on a growing number of PT6A platforms, the FAST solution captures, analyzes and wirelessly transmits a wide range of engine and aircraft data after each flight, providing detailed, customized alerts and trend monitoring information directly to the operator within minutes of engine shutdown.

“I wish I’d had this technology 30 years ago,” remarks Rob. “It’s light years ahead of what we were doing back then—and it keeps evolving.”

Besides making operators’ lives simpler through automation, the FAST solution also has the capacity for enhanced functionality going forward. For instance, the company is looking at introducing FAST’s propeller vibration trend monitoring technology – available for regional turboprop aircraft – as a solution for PT6A-powered aircraft in the future. That’s another reason why Rob believes it is now the most attractive solution for customers.

Ultimately, though, what’s most important is to be doing ECTM, no matter whether it’s with pen and paper or state-of-the-art digital solutions. “When I talk to customers about FAST,” Rob concludes, “what I’m selling them is not the hardware itself, but the full value of automated ECTM to their operations and asset value.”

Rob has also helped PT6A customers master the art of engine rigging by appearing in a detailed instructional video. Read all about it here.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Blackhawk Delivers 800th XP Upgrade

Blackhawk Modifications has sold 800 of its XP engine upgrades with the delivery of a Phoenix-edition King Air C90-1 with its XP135A engine upgrade. The company also announced that flight testing of its latest program, the XP67A engine upgrade for 12,500-pound and 14,000-pound-gross-weight models of the King Air 300, is underway and that it is continuing a $50,000 pre-certification discount on orders for that program, first announced this summer.

The Phoenix-edition 1982 King Air C90-1 on display at EAA AirVenture 2018 where 800th customers Gregg and Jan Goodall first saw the airplane.

Blackhawk expects the XP67A upgrade for the King Air 300 to deliver improved performance, including a maximum cruise speed of 345 to 350 knots, time to climb from sea level to FL350 in less than 17 minutes, and better performance at higher density altitudes. The upgrade includes two new P&WC PT6A-67A engines with a factory new engine warranty of five years/2,500 hours, installation drawings, STC paperwork, approved flight manual supplement, instructions for continued airworthiness, training from FlightSafety International for PT6A line maintenance, and a two-year subscription to P&WC engine maintenance/parts manuals. Qualifying core PT6A-60A engines will be trade-in credited at $70 per hour each for time remaining on the 3,600-hour TBO. 

The STC flight test program for the XP67A upgrade for the King Air 300 will include measuring parameters such as single- and multi-engine handling, aircraft performance, engine and accessory cooling, stall speeds and characteristics, landing characteristics, propeller noise and vibration, and high-speed airframe/engine characteristics. Blackhawk expects FAA STC approval for the upgrade next summer.  

Blackhawk’s Phoenix program allows owners of legacy King Airs to upgrade from a menu of options, including engines, avionics, and paint and interior. Blackhawk’s 800th XP upgrade, a 1982 King Air C90-1, was delivered to Gregg and Jan Goodall of Breckenridge, Texas, and replaced the stock PT6A-21 engines with the XP135A engine upgrade, generating a 36 percent increase in available horsepower, a 59 percent increase in climb rate, more than 270 knots maximum cruise speed, and a 19,000-foot single-engine service ceiling. The Goodalls also opted for Phoenix signature paint and interior design, the Raisbeck Epic package, and new Garmin glass-panel avionics including two G600TXi displays, WAAS-enabled GTN 650 and 750, GTX 335 transponder for ADS-B Out, and the L3 Lynx transponder for ADS-B In and Out. 

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

A Brief Look at the PT6A Powered Beechcraft Model 99 & Variants

The Beechcraft Model 99 is a civilian aircraft produced by the Beechcraft. It is also known as the Beech 99 Airliner and the Commuter 99. The 99 is a twin-engine, unpressurized, 15 to 17 passenger seat turboprop aircraft, derived from the earlier Beechcraft King Air and Queen Air. It uses the wings of the Queen Air, the engines and nacelles of the King Air, and sub-systems from both, with a specifically-designed nose structure. Design and development

Jamaica Air Shuttle Beech 99 In Flight

Designed in the 1960s as a replacement for the Beechcraft Model 18, it first flew in July 1966. It received type certification on May 2, 1968, and 62 aircraft were delivered by the end of the year.

In 1984, the Beechcraft 1900, a pressurized 19-passenger airplane, was introduced as the follow-on aircraft.

Production ended in early 1987. Nearly half the Beech 99s in airline service are now operated as freighters by Ameriflight.

Variants

  • 99 Airliner: Twin-engined Commuter and cargo transport aircraft, 10,400 lb max takeoff weight, accommodation for a crew of two and up to 15 passengers. powered by two 550-hp (410-kW) Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-20 turboprop engines.
  • 99 Executive: Executive transport version of the 99 Airliner.
  • 99A Airliner: Same as the 99 Airliner, but powered by two Pratt & Whitney PT6A-27 engines flat-rated at 550 hp.
  • A99A Airliner: One of a kind, 99A Airliner without wing center section tanks; this aircraft has been scrapped.
  • B99 Airliner: Improved version, 10,900 lb max takeoff weight, powered by two 680-hp (507-kW) Pratt & Whitney PT6A-27/28 engines.
  • B99 Executive: Executive transport version of the B99 Airliner.
  • C99 Commuter: Improved version, 11,300 lb (5,100 kg) max takeoff weight, Pratt & Whitney PT6A-36 (engines flat rated at 715 hp)
Ameriflight Beech C99 freighter takes off from the Mojave Airport

Operators

In July 2018, 105 Beechcraft B99 were in airline service, all in the Americas:[1]

Specifications (Model 99A)

General characteristics

  • Crew: One
  • Capacity: Normally 15 passengers (8-seat ‘Business Executive’ model available)
  • Length: 44 ft 6¾ in (13.58 m)
  • Wingspan: 45 ft 10½ in (13.98 m)
  • Height: 14 ft 4⅓ in (4.37 m)
  • Wing area: 279.7 ft² (25.99 m²)
  • Empty weight: 5,533 lb (varies depending upon equipment and configuration) (2,515 kg)
  • Loaded weight:
  • Max. takeoff weight: 10,400, 10,900, or 11,300 lb – see above (4,727 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Pratt & Whitney PT6A-20, -27. or -36 turbopropHartzell constant speed, feathering, and reversing, 550, 680, or 715 eshp depending upon model/mod status each

Performance

First read at https://www.revolvy.com/page/Beechcraft-Model-99

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Quest Eyes Special Missions Roles for Kodiak

Quest Aircraft is seeking to broaden the customer base for its Kodiak 100 single-engined turboprop with the expansion into the special missions market.

Rob Wells, chief executive of the Sandpoint, Idaho–based airframer, says the utility aircraft has found a successful niche in the charter, commercial short-haul, corporate, and cargo markets, but its unique features make it an ideal platform for other applications, such as law enforcement, surveillance and military transport. “We have been working on a concept for a year now, and there is no shortage of interest,” he says.

The Kodiak’s appeal comes from a host of features including its wing, which has a discontinuous leading edge, giving it “fantastic” low-speed performance.

The Kodiak’s high-wing loading also creates a stable platform – a necessity for a surveillance operation. The Kodiak’s cargo pod can store sensors, and its large cargo door allows for the easy transfer of equipment, while the large windows are “ideal”, Wells says, for an observation role. The aircraft also has a 9.5h loiter time.

In April, Quest introduced the second-generation version of the Kodiak – powered by Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-34 – and Wells says response to the aircraft has been “overwhelming”, with 10 examples delivered to date.

The Series II has a host of new enhancements and equipment, including Garmin’s next generation G1000NXi flightdeck; additional storage in the cockpit; a restyled cargo doorstep to “reduce weight and improve functionality”; and improved fuselage seals to provide “even better” soundproofing and cabin ventilation.

Since its introduction in 2008, Quest has incorporated over 200 enhancements into the short take-off and landing Kodiak, including the introduction of two new interiors; an increased landing weight; and the integration of the Garmin GFC 700 automatic flight control system.

FlightGlobal’s Fleets Analyzer database records a global fleet of more than 255 of the all-metal aircraft. The company shipped 31 examples in 2017.

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS