Category Archives: PT6A

4 Must-Haves For PT6A Engine Line Maintenance

Certain equipment is essential for keeping a PT6A engine running smoothly. Here are four tools and parts that either the aircraft owner or the operator needs to have when doing routine maintenance work.

1. FUEL NOZZLE FLOW CHECK AND PRESSURE CHECK FIXTURES

Typically, ultrasonic fuel nozzle cleaning should be carried out every 200 to 400 hours(1) of flying time, to make sure the nozzle is performing properly and there are no problems such as blockages. “Whenever you clean your fuel nozzle, you should also check it for leaks and flow irregularities like drooling, spitting, streaking or other patterns that could damage the hot section,” explains Yves Houde, PT6A Customer Manager at Pratt & Whitney Canada.

Checking for irregularities of the fuel nozzle requires the use of both a flow check fixture and a pressure check fixture. These are fitted over the nozzle to help identify tips that need to be cleaned or replaced and verify the presence of any leaks before the aircraft is returned to service. Learn more about what to check for in our article on fuel nozzle maintenance.

2. BORESCOPE KIT

Whenever undertaking fuel nozzle maintenance, make sure to perform a borescope inspection at the same time. To do this, you will need a borescope kit, including a guide tube for accessing hard-to-reach areas of the engine. Using a borescope is much easier than the old-fashioned method, which involves opening up the engine.

A borescope allows for assessment of hot section components for wear or damage that may not be evident from a regular ground power check or flight data collection. For instance, on a single power turbine engine, inserting a borescope through the exhaust duct port and power turbine stage may reveal trailing edge cracks on compressor turbine blades.

“It’s the number-one equipment you need to have for line maintenance,” says Yves. “The time when fuel nozzle cleaning is performed is an ideal moment for operators to assess the hot section’s condition with a borescope. We also advise using it to check the first-stage compressor for foreign object damage every year.”

Borescope kits are made by a number of companies. PT6A owners can check their engine’s maintenance manual for the recommended product’s part number and order it from a designated supplier.

It’s hard to generalize about PT6A engines, but there’s some equipment you can’t do without. It’s the core of the line maintenance you need to perform.

YVES HOUDE

3. OIL FILTER PULLER/PUSHER TOOL

Oil filter maintenance is recommended every 100 hours or so. When doing this procedure, use a puller/pusher to open and close the filter’s check valve. While the oil filter can be popped out by hand, it’s not a good idea to do so, since it could damage the oil filter check valve seal, which in turn could lead to static oil leak when the engine is not running.

4. TURBINE RINSE TUBE AND COMPRESSOR WASH RIG

PT6A engines may need to be washed periodically to remove salt and other impurities; how often depends on the operating environment. Whenever it’s time to clean the engine, a compressor wash rig and turbine rinse tube are essential.

Unlike other engines, most PT6A engines already have a wash ring installed around the air intake, so all you need to do is connect the compressor wash rig and insert the water. After the compressor wash, use the turbine rinse tube to clean the turbine as well.

You don’t need any special cleaning solution for a desalination wash—pure, ionized water will do. “But it’s always a good idea to test the water quality first to make sure it’s suitable for cleaning,” adds Yves. “If you use the wrong water, washing may end up causing more problems than it solves.” Have a look at our article on desalination washes for more tips on keeping your engine free of contaminants.

(1) Refer to your Engine Maintenance Manual (EMM), Periodic Inspection Fuel Nozzle Cleaning interval for the interval that applies to your engine model.

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Epic Flies Second PT6A-67A Powered E1000 Prototype

The speedy single-engine turboprop is closing in on its long-awaited market introduction.

Epic Aircraft in Bend, Oregon, has flown the second and final production conforming prototype E1000, putting the company on short final for FAA certification of the all-composite single-engine turboprop, which is now anticipated to enter the market by this year’s third quarter.

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The PT6A Powered Beechcraft King Air 250

Beechcraft King Air 250 is a highly advanced turboprop business aircraft developed by Textron Aviation.

The aircraft secured type certification from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in June 2011. It also received similar certification from the National Civil Aviation Agency of Brazil (ANAC) in the same year. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) certified the aircraft in April 2012.

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The PT6A Engine Proves Its Worth Time And Time Again

No one appreciates the PT6A’s reliability more than customers flying in inhospitable environments, who stake their lives on its performance – like Quest Kodiak aircraft pilot Mark Brown.

Mark Brown still vividly recalls the nerves he felt before embarking on his first flight across the open ocean a few years ago.

Marketing director and factory demo pilot for Quest Aircraft, Mark has aviation in his blood. He was born into a family of pilots and flew for the first time at the age of 13 – but even he could not help wonder about flying solo across the Atlantic on a Kodiak powered by a single PT6A-34 engine.

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Inside the Wasp Shop with the Aeroshell Aerobatic Team & Covington Aircraft

Gene McNeely started flying airshows in 1986 and has been a stalwart presence on the AeroShell aerobatic team, flying a Wasp-powered North American T-6. He can only guess at his total flying time behind the engine: “I would say 15,000 hours…probably more than that.” He does remember exactly how he got there, though. “I got out of the Navy and…started cropdusting, and the first engine I sat behind was the [Pratt &Whitney] R-985, which we’d adapted to the Stearman,” he recalls.

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Cessna And FedEx Renew Their Vows with the 408 SkyCourier

When the press release on Cessna’s new twin turboprop came pixeling into my inbox Tuesday morning, my first reaction was: a new skydiving airplane! Woo-hoo! This further proves that self-interest easily overpowers rational thought, but in a more sober moment, I realized that in aviation as in everything else, history repeats.

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Piper’s Impressive PT6A Powered Cheyenne III

When Piper Aircraft announced its plans to build a big-cabin turboprop in late 1977, time was of the essence – only, we didn’t know it. It took another three years to get the airplane certificated, during which time the robust state of the general aviation manufacturing economy had begun to unravel. The Cheyenne III’s main competition, the Beech Super King Air 200, introduced in 1974, had an established head start, and industry sales volume was no longer the rising road to riches during the 1980s that it had been in the 1970s.

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PT6A-67P Powered Pilatus PC-12 NG: The Survivor that Keeps Adapting

When the Pilatus PC-12 first landed on the scene back in 1989, expectations were fairly modest. Earmarked for sales in the 200 region, nobody would have been surprised if the PC-12 had come in, served its purpose, and been resigned to history along with a plethora of similar aircraft.

But this was not to be the case.

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