Category Archives: PT6A Engine

Blackhawk Launches XP67A Engine+ Upgrade Program for the King Air 300 Series

OSHKOSH, Wisconsin – July 23, 2018 – Blackhawk Modifications is proud to announce the launch of the XP67A Engine+ Upgrade for the King Air 300 Series, which pairs the Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) 1200 shaft horsepower (SHP) PT6A-67A engine with the MT 5-blade composite propeller for superior performance, noise abatement, and weight reduction. Blackhawk now has a King Air 300 in experimental category and will begin certification efforts in August.

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Pilot Report: The PT6A Powered Piaggio Avanti Evo

The P.180 Avanti Evo has a “wow” factor that is not present with many other twin turboprops of a similar size. Yes, it does have three lifting surfaces, a T-tail and two pusher propellers but it’s how they are put together that is the important thing. The forward wing (not to be called a canard, as it has no moving flight controls other than forward flaps) is positioned on the underside of a gracefully sweeping nose and is home to two pitot tubes underneath and, unusually in Western types, has a significant anhedral.

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Pratt & Whitney Canada’s PT6A-140AG Engine Achieves Seamless Entry Into Service on Air Tractor’s AT-502XP

Marking a successful entry into service (EIS), roughly 25 PT6A-140AG-powered AT-502XP aircraft have been delivered to customers around the world since certification. The EIS of Pratt & Whitney Canada’s latest engine for aerial application aircraft is progressing and as the application season in the Northern Hemisphere winds down, the engine has been performing very well. Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) is a subsidiary of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX).

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Trip Report: PT6A-34 Powered Quest Kodiak Series II

Driving on an early May morning to Sandpoint, Idaho, to see the Quest Aircraft factory and then fly a new Kodiak 100 Series II to California, it was clear that icing conditions were not only forecast but likely in the wet gray clouds that shrouded the local mountains. For the flight-into-known-icing-certified Kodiak, however, icing is not a problem, and in the 11 years since it entered service, the capable utility single-engine turboprop has proven its mettle in challenging flying all over the world.

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FAA Awards Supplemental Type Certificate for King Air 350ER XP67A Engine Upgrade to the PT6A-67A

SPARKS, Nev. (June 12, 2018)  – Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has teamed with Blackhawk Modifications’ subsidiary for government and military sales division, Vector-Hawk Aerospace (VHA), to offer the Blackhawk XP67A Engine+ Upgrade Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) Kit for the Beechcraft King Air 350ER. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recently approved Blackhawk Modifications’ XP67A engine upgrade for the aircraft at takeoff weights up to 17,500 pounds maximum allowable takeoff weight (MTOW), significantly increasing the weight capability for special mission applications.

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The PT6A-50 Powered De Havilland Canada DASH-7

During the 1950s and 1960s, the aircraft manufacturer De Havilland Canada (DHC) acquired extensive experience in the construction of small and medium capacity transports with short takeoff & landing (STOL) capabilities, such as the “Otter”, “Twin Otter”, “Caribou”, and “Buffalo”. In the early 1970s, DHC decided to create a four-engine turboprop medium STOL airliner, which emerged as the “DHC-7” AKA “DASH-7”. The DASH-7 was only built in modest numbers, though it did prove useful as a military surveillance platform. DHC followed it with a twin-turboprop airliner, the “DHC-8” AKA “DASH-8”, which proved much more successful. This document provides a history and description of the DASH-7 and DASH-8.

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4 Must-Haves For PT6A Engine Line Maintenance

This article originally appeared on the P&WC Airtime Blog.

Certain equipment is essential for keeping a PT6A engine running smoothly. Here are four tools and parts that either the aircraft owner or the operator needs to have when doing routine maintenance work.

1. FUEL NOZZLE FLOW CHECK AND PRESSURE CHECK FIXTURES

Typically, ultrasonic fuel nozzle cleaning should be carried out every 200 to 400 hours(1) of flying time, to make sure the nozzle is performing properly and there are no problems such as blockages. “Whenever you clean your fuel nozzle, you should also check it for leaks and flow irregularities like drooling, spitting, streaking or other patterns that could damage the hot section,” explains Yves Houde, PT6A Customer Manager at Pratt & Whitney Canada.

Checking for irregularities of the fuel nozzle requires the use of both a flow check fixture and a pressure check fixture. These are fitted over the nozzle to help identify tips that need to be cleaned or replaced and verify the presence of any leaks before the aircraft is returned to service. Learn more about what to check for in our article on fuel nozzle maintenance.

2. BORESCOPE KIT

Whenever undertaking fuel nozzle maintenance, make sure to perform a borescope inspection at the same time. To do this, you will need a borescope kit, including a guide tube for accessing hard-to-reach areas of the engine. Using a borescope is much easier than the old-fashioned method, which involves opening up the engine.

A borescope allows for assessment of hot section components for wear or damage that may not be evident from a regular ground power check or flight data collection. For instance, on a single power turbine engine, inserting a borescope through the exhaust duct port and power turbine stage may reveal trailing edge cracks on compressor turbine blades.

“It’s the number-one equipment you need to have for line maintenance,” says Yves. “The time when fuel nozzle cleaning is performed is an ideal moment for operators to assess the hot section’s condition with a borescope. We also advise using it to check the first-stage compressor for foreign object damage every year.”

Borescope kits are made by a number of companies. PT6A owners can check their engine’s maintenance manual for the recommended product’s part number and order it from a designated supplier.

It’s hard to generalize about PT6A engines, but there’s some equipment you can’t do without. It’s the core of the line maintenance you need to perform.

YVES HOUDE

3. OIL FILTER PULLER/PUSHER TOOL

Oil filter maintenance is recommended every 100 hours or so. When doing this procedure, use a puller/pusher to open and close the filter’s check valve. While the oil filter can be popped out by hand, it’s not a good idea to do so, since it could damage the oil filter check valve seal, which in turn could lead to static oil leak when the engine is not running.

4. TURBINE RINSE TUBE AND COMPRESSOR WASH RIG

PT6A engines may need to be washed periodically to remove salt and other impurities; how often depends on the operating environment. Whenever it’s time to clean the engine, a compressor wash rig and turbine rinse tube are essential.

Unlike other engines, most PT6A engines already have a wash ring installed around the air intake, so all you need to do is connect the compressor wash rig and insert the water. After the compressor wash, use the turbine rinse tube to clean the turbine as well.

You don’t need any special cleaning solution for a desalination wash—pure, ionized water will do. “But it’s always a good idea to test the water quality first to make sure it’s suitable for cleaning,” adds Yves. “If you use the wrong water, washing may end up causing more problems than it solves.” Have a look at our article on desalination washes for more tips on keeping your engine free of contaminants.

(1) Refer to your Engine Maintenance Manual (EMM), Periodic Inspection Fuel Nozzle Cleaning interval for the interval that applies to your engine model.

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The Douglas DC-3: 81 Years and Going Strong

The Douglas DC-3 Doesn’t Know the Meaning of the Word “Quit”

The same year the German airship Hindenburg crossed the Atlantic, the still-flying-today Douglas DC-3 was introduced to the world. The DC-3 is widely viewed as one of the most significant transport aircraft in history, due to its massive and long-lasting impact on the airline industry, and aerospace engineering. I got the chance to interview Ric Hallquist, the retired Chief DC-3 Pilot for Missionary Flights International who flew and worked on the beefy twin engine transport plane for over 30 years.

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