Category Archives: Pratt & Whitney Canada

Turbine Conversions selects PT6A-21 engines for Cessna 206 conversion

Turbine Conversions, Ltd. and Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) have signed a long-term contract for the sale of PT6A-21 engines to power the recently announced Cessna 206 turbine conversion. P&WC is a subsidiary of United Technologies Corp.

Turbine Conversions has been converting aircraft using P&WC engines since 1990, but company president Bill Hatfield first encountered the PT6 engine when he installed a PT6A-34AG engine in his Grumman Ag Cat in 1975.

“I still fly my Grumman Ag Cat, and that PT6A-34AG engine continues to serve me well after more than 40 years,” said Hatfield, one of the most respected and well-known pioneers of the agricultural industry. “The relationships I have built with P&WC employees over the years have likewise endured and helped empower our business and those of our own clients. We are delighted to have struck yet another arrangement with P&WC to power our Cessna 206 conversion.”

“Turbine Conversions has consistently demonstrated its understanding of the factors that drive successful conversion programs,” said Denis Parisien, vice-president, General Aviation, P&WC. “With the 206 turbine conversion program, our PT6A-21 engines will replace piston engines so operators of the converted aircraft will benefit from a considerable increase in power, better hot and high performance and a TBO [time between overhaul] of 3,600 hours. Combined with that is our OEM [original equipment manufacturer] warranty and a global customer support network that is second to none.”

cessna 206

The PT6A engine boasts powerful performance and unmatched versatility. PT6 technology has powered 125 different applications since its introduction. More than 46,000 PT6 engines have been manufactured, with 23,000 now in service. The engine has logged more than 375 million flight hours.

“Anyone can say they’re the best; we have the numbers to prove it,” said Parisien. “It’s more than an engine. The PT6A engine offers the best of both worlds: Its proven technology is built upon a remarkable body of engineering achievement that has written new chapters in aviation history in collaboration with our customers, and it’s also this technology that continues to make new aircraft applications possible. We’re already moving on to the next innovation.”

The PT6A engine’s flexible architecture and modular reverse-flow design simplify installation in both single- and twin-engine installations as well as tractor and pusher propeller configurations. Simple on-wing maintenance is possible for most tasks, whereas other engines might need a shop visit.

H/T Skies Magazine.

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Pratt & Whitney Developing New Services On Sensor Data And Analytics

Pratt & Whitney Developing New Services On Sensor Data And AnalyticsPassengers are more and more concerned about the collection of flight data and overall safety when they fly. After a series of catastrophic aerial accidents, many of which have taken place in Southeast Asia, the average consumer is demanding ever-higher standards.

In order to achieve a safer future for the aviation world, it will be necessary to develop a whole slew of technologies for recording, transmitting, and maintaining real-time data. However, the true resolution to the problem will take place in the maintenance world. Continue reading Pratt & Whitney Developing New Services On Sensor Data And Analytics

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Things Are Looking Up For Young People Who Consider An Aviation Career

Things Are Looking Up For Young People Who Consider An Aviation CareerIt was not that long ago when the United States was slogging through one of the longest and deepest recessions in the whole history of the nation.

One of the most potent parts of the recession was the lack of job growth and difficulty that people faced in finding new opportunities, even if they aggressively “retrained” for other fields of work. Continue reading Things Are Looking Up For Young People Who Consider An Aviation Career

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Pratt & Whitney Wins Major New Department Of Defense Contract

Pratt & Whitney Wins Major New Department Of Defense ContractAs you can imagine, the process of getting and keeping a Department of Defense contract is a very complex one. So, the news that Pratt & Whitney has won a modification to amend its existing F-35 Lightning II contract to a whopping $1.05 billion stands out in aviation news.

Under the new agreement with the U.S. Air Force, Pratt & Whitney will not only be providing dozens of aircraft propulsion systems, but will also offer its unparalleled expertise in the areas of program management and aircraft engineering support. Continue reading Pratt & Whitney Wins Major New Department Of Defense Contract

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What Can We Expect From The Future Of Aircraft Engine Maintenance?

What Can We Expect From The Future Of Aircraft Engine Maintenance?Aircrafts — and their engines — are constantly changing. This isn’t surprising, since customers are growing to expect faster, smoother flights for longer distances all around the world.

At the same time, fleet managers are seeking out ways to achieve greater levels of efficiency. Efficiency means shorter maintenance procedures that are nonetheless just as effective, or even more effective than average, bringing aircraft back to peak condition faster. Continue reading What Can We Expect From The Future Of Aircraft Engine Maintenance?

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Pratt & Whitney Is A Trusted Brand When It Comes To Aircraft Engines For Sale

Pratt & Whitney Is A Trusted Brand When It Comes To Aircraft Engines For SaleHere at Covington Aircraft, one of the companies that we respect most in the world of aviation is Pratt & Whitney. The Pratt & Whitney engineering and design teams have achieved some truly great things in aviation both recently and in the past.

As of right now, Pratt & Whitney is responsible for the development of one of the most popular, if not the most popular, engines in the world: The Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6 Series. The PT6 Series has been around since the 1950s, but continues to impress aviators today. Continue reading Pratt & Whitney Is A Trusted Brand When It Comes To Aircraft Engines For Sale

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What Are Aircraft Engine OEM Approvals And Why Is This Important In An Overhaul

What Are Aircraft Engine OEM Approvals And Why Is This Important In An OverhaulYour aircraft is due for an engine overhaul. Whether it is a PT6A engine from Pratt and Whitney, or the R-985 and the R-1340 radial engines, you want the best work done to maintain your aircraft’s resale value. But your main goal during an overhaul should be safety. You want your plane’s engine to be overhauled with OEM approved parts. This is the safest way to perform a full engine overhaul. Continue reading What Are Aircraft Engine OEM Approvals And Why Is This Important In An Overhaul

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PT6 Celebrates Fifty Years Part 1

When it was developed in 1963, the PT6 was the first turboprop engine rated at 450 shaft horsepower, impressing Beechcraft to the point that the company chose to install the engine in their King Air line of turboprop twins.  Fast-forward 50 years, and Beechcraft still choose the PT6, although of ever-increasing power ratings, to power their engines.

 Before The PT6

beechcraftPratt & Whitney began development of the PT6 in the late 1950’s in an attempt to replace the manufacturer’s Wasp radial engines, developed during in the 1930’s.  In 1925, Frederick Rentschler, President of Wright Aeronautical, approached his brother, Gordon, and Edward Deeds, who were both on the board of Niles Bement Pond, convincing them that Pratt & Whitney Machine Tool, a subsidiary of Niles, should fund the creation of a new aircraft engine Rentschler and a colleage, George Mead, were developing.  The engine was to be a large, air-cooled radial design.  The executives at Pratt & Whitney saw an opportunity for growth and lent Rentschler $250,000, the use of the Pratt & Whitney name and space in their building to begin creating the new engine.  Rentschler left Wright Aeronautical and took over operations of Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Division, The first of the Wasp series debuted on December 24, 1925, quickly becoming one of the most widely used aircraft engines in the industry due to their superior speed, rate of climb and reliability.  Charles Lindbergh and Ameila Earhart both set records in Wasp-powered aircraft.

Wasp to Hornet

 With the development of the PT6 still a few decades away, Pratt & Whitney created the next line of radial engines, the Hornet, rated at 525 horsepower.  The dependability of both the Wasp and the Hornet made them very popular among commercial aircraft, and as the public use of air travel increased, so did the demand for Pratt & Whitney engines.  As it became apparent that the United States would enter World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt called on manufacturers to produce 50,000 aircraft a year for military use, requiring Pratt & Whitney to expand its workforce from 3,000 to 40,000.  Throughout the war, Pratt & Whitney continued to innovate, until, by the end of the war, their largest engine provided 3,600 horsepower.  However, radial engines were slowly being replaced by lighter turboprop engines.

Vision of the PT6

In 1957, Pratt & Whitney saw an opportunity to channel profits from the piston engine spare parts business to the development of smaller gas turbine engines than those currently being manufactured in the United States. The company gathered a team of 12 young engineers after conducting market studies that found there was a need for a 500 shaft horsepower engine that could replace piston engines, such as the Wasp and Hornet.  In December 1963, Pratt & Whitney shipped the first of the PT6 series, the PT6A-6, a highly innovative gas turbine representing technology advances that were significant at the time.  Because gas turbines have a higher power to weight ratio than piston engines, the PT6 was perfect for aviation engines.

pt6aThe PT6 has enjoyed a rich and colorful history since it began production in 1963, and Pratt & Whitney is proud to celebrate the 50th anniversary of this timeless aircraft engine.  Learn more about the colorful past, pioneers who flew this engine and continuing evolution of an engine ahead of its time.  For more information on the PT6 or about aircraft maintenance, contact Covington Aircraft online or by telephone today.

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Aviation Station: Landing Equipment/Landing Gear

landing gear

Pilots use cockpit controls that receive information from the engine, like the PT-6A, for optimum ground handling of turbo prop airplanes. However, without landing equipment and gear, the plane could not be controlled on the ground at all.  Landing equipment and gear are used for takeoff, landing, and taxiing of an airplane.

Conventional Landing Gear

Planes with two wheels forward of the aircraft’s center of gravity are known as conventional landing gear.  Often seen in older aircraft, pilots must brake carefully as, without a wheel at the front of the plane, the turbo prop airplanes pitch easily.  Because the tail is free to move in any direction, planes with conventional landing gear are difficult to control when landing or taking off, even with the cockpit controls found with the PT-6A engine.

Tricycle Landing Gear

Tricycle landing gear looks much like its name indicates, with one wheel on the nose of the plane and two main wheels.  This configuration makes the plane less likely to tip over and easier to handle on the ground.

Tandem Landing Gear

Used for very large aircraft, tandem landing gear has two sets of main landing gear, located one behind the other on the fuselage.  This allows planes with highly flexible wings to be better managed on the ground.  In some cases, small wheels are added to the tips of the wings to keep them from scraping the ground.

Cockpit Controls

Turbo prop airplanes, such as the PT-6A, often have cockpit power-plant controls for greater ground-handling capability.  Although these controls focus on propeller control, the propeller and landing gear often work in tandem, especially during takeoff and landing.   Because landing equipment and gear are a crucial part of the ground operations of any airplane, these cockpit controls found on the PT-6A play an important role in ensuring the safe takeoff and landing of turboprop airplanes.

Visit us at www.covingtonaircraft.com for more information about radial and turbine engines, such as the PT-6A.  Learn more about overhauls, maintenance and repairs, and be sure to find us on Facebook and LinkedIn.

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