Category Archives: Pratt & Whitney Canada

The Cessna Conquest I: A Reliable Workhorse Is an Excellent Steed for Families and Small Corporations

This article first appeared over at AOPA here

Cessna was a little late out of the gate getting a turboprop into its lineup. First was the Cessna 441 Conquest in model year 1978, a full 14 years after Beechcraft’s King Air. Next was the Model 425 Corsair in model year 1981. The Corsair is smaller than the 441 and uses 450-shaft-horsepower Pratt & Whitney PT6s versus the 441’s Honeywell (Garrett) TPE 331 engines.

Concurrent with a max takeoff weight increase to 8,600 pounds, Cessna dropped the Corsair moniker and renamed the 425 Conquest I while reassigning the 441 the name Conquest II. Confused yet? The 425 is best described as a 421 Golden Eagle with turbines in place of pistons. Aside from sharing the same basic dimensions, the similarities between the 421 and Conquest I fade quickly. The 425 is substantially beefed up structurally and has more robust systems.

Since it’s based on a piston design, the 425 is easy to fly and an easy step up. In fact, with the easy-to-operate turbines, many would argue that the 425 is less complex than the 421. Cockpit visibility is excellent, as is the instrument panel layout. Cabin seats are comfortable once seated. Cessna’s “wide oval” cabin biases more toward elbow room than headroom, so there will be nothing close to stand-up comfort.

Performance-wise, the Conquest is good for 250 KTAS at typical cruise altitudes in the mid teens to low 20s. As is usual with turbines, the fuel burn drops off the higher you fly. Also typical of turbines, the winds will dictate choice of cruise altitude vs. fuel burn. Owners often figure 500 pounds of Jet-A the first hour and 400 pounds/hour after that. Blackhawk Modifications Inc. offers 425 owners PT6A-135 engines in place of the original -112s. The Blackhawk holds its max power to much higher altitudes than the original engines, resulting in faster time to climb and a 20-knot increase in true airspeed.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BgdxW6qF_Xy/

Range with tanks full is about 1,200 nm, which leaves about 700 pounds of payload. With six adults on board, range is about 700 nm. The 425 is confident at all weights on 4,000-foot runways at sea level. At lighter weights, 3,000-foot runways are doable.

Vref values a 1981 Conquest I at $625,000 while a 1986 model fetches an average of $875,000. Once an owner swallows the reality of six-figure engine overhauls, higher fuel burn, and other substantial cost increases of owning a turbine, he or she will be impressed with the Conquest’s performance and reliability.

Pete Bedell is a pilot for a major airline and co-owner of a Cessna 172 and Beechcraft Baron D55.

SPEC SHEET
Cessna 425 Conquest I

Powerplants | (2) 450-shp Pratt & Whitney PT6
Length | 35 ft 10 in
Height | 12 ft 7 in
Wingspan | 44 ft 1 in
Seats | 2+6
Max takeoff weight | 8,600 lb
Takeoff distance over 50-ft obstacle | 2,800 ft
Max cruise speed | 264 kt
Landing distance over 50-ft obstacle | 2,482 ft
Range | 1,200 nm

Peter A. Bedell

Pete Bedell is a pilot for a major airline and co-owner of a Cessna 172M and Beechcraft Baron D55.

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A Look at the PT6A-21 Powered Beechcraft King Air C90A

The Beechcraft King Air family is part of a line of twin-turboprop aircraft produced by Beechcraft. The King Air line comprises a number of models that have been divided into two families; the Model 90 and 100 series are known as King Airs, while the Model 200 and 300 series were originally marketed as Super King Airs, with “Super” being dropped by Beechcraft in 1996. Since production began in 1964, over 3,100 aircraft have been built. Production is currently still active, giving the Beechcraft King Air the longest continual production run of any civilian aircraft of its class.

Continue reading A Look at the PT6A-21 Powered Beechcraft King Air C90A

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A Quicker Way to Overhaul Your PT6-A Engine

This article originally appeared on the P&WC Airtime Blog.

Aircraft engine overhauls are all about flying like new and they require careful planning. It all takes time and a maintenance scheduling. Imagine replacing your engine with one that has already been overhauled, all at a guaranteed price?

Continue reading A Quicker Way to Overhaul Your PT6-A Engine

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PT6A-35 Powered JetProp DLX: No Mirage Of Power In This Malibu Conversion

Piper’s sleek Malibu/Mirage pressurized singles have always been good performers once they get up to altitude. It’s the takeoff and climb phases that leave a little to be desired. JetProp LLC’s DL and DLX conversions solve that with an infusion of an extra few hundred horsepower.

Continue reading PT6A-35 Powered JetProp DLX: No Mirage Of Power In This Malibu Conversion

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The 450hp Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior Powered Winjeel ‘404 – A Home Coming and Return to Flight

by Stephan Bowtell, Nathan Bowtell and Phil Buckley
Rising like a young eagle to fly once more, a former Royal Australian Air Force CAC Winjeel A85-404 has returned to the skies in Australia to take her place as a living warbird once again.

Continue reading The 450hp Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior Powered Winjeel ‘404 – A Home Coming and Return to Flight

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FAA Awards Supplemental Type Certificate for King Air 350ER XP67A Engine Upgrade to the PT6A-67A

SPARKS, Nev. (June 12, 2018)  – Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has teamed with Blackhawk Modifications’ subsidiary for government and military sales division, Vector-Hawk Aerospace (VHA), to offer the Blackhawk XP67A Engine+ Upgrade Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) Kit for the Beechcraft King Air 350ER. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recently approved Blackhawk Modifications’ XP67A engine upgrade for the aircraft at takeoff weights up to 17,500 pounds maximum allowable takeoff weight (MTOW), significantly increasing the weight capability for special mission applications.

Continue reading FAA Awards Supplemental Type Certificate for King Air 350ER XP67A Engine Upgrade to the PT6A-67A

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A Look at the PT6A-67AG Powered 710P Thrush A.K.A the 770 Fire Angel

In December 2017, The Aerotech Group, based in Kent Town, SA Australia, took possession of its new 710P Thrush. The purchase was made through Campbell Briggs of Statewide Aviation, Australia’s Thrush dealer, based in Moree NSW. The aircraft is powered by Pratt & Whitney Canada’s PT6A-67AG engine. This may have seemed an unusual purchase to many, as The Aerotech Group has been buying Air Tractors since the early 1980s and has been a big supporter of the brand. And it still is, currently having 12 Air Tractors in its fleet.

Continue reading A Look at the PT6A-67AG Powered 710P Thrush A.K.A the 770 Fire Angel

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The PT6A Engine Proves Its Worth Time And Time Again

This article originally appeared on the P&WC Airtime Blog.

No one appreciates the PT6A’s reliability more than customers flying in inhospitable environments, who stake their lives on its performance – like Quest Kodiak aircraft pilot Mark Brown.

Mark Brown still vividly recalls the nerves he felt before embarking on his first flight across the open ocean a few years ago.

Marketing director and factory demo pilot for Quest Aircraft, Mark has aviation in his blood. He was born into a family of pilots and flew for the first time at the age of 13 – but even he could not help wonder about flying solo across the Atlantic on a Kodiak powered by a single PT6A-34 engine.

Continue reading The PT6A Engine Proves Its Worth Time And Time Again

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