Category Archives: Aviation

questkodiak_featured

Quest secures record order for Kodiak Powered by PT6A

Quest Aircraft has secured an order from Japanese start-up operator Sky Trek for 20 Kodiak single-engined turboprops. The deal with the membership-based charter provider was announced on 15 November, and marks the largest single order to date for the high-wing, all-metal type.

The first Kodiak was shipped to the Toyko-based Sky Trek in late October and the remaining units will be delivered over the coming 12 months.

Quest – owned by Japanese companies Setouchi Holdings and Mitsui – says Sky Trek was launched on 7 November and plans to begin charter services in the first half of 2017, offering membership-based programmes to private individuals and corporations.

“The Kodiak is extremely well-suited for use in Japan, where the topography and private transportation infrastructure can be challenging,” says Quest, referring to the aircraft’s short take-off and landing performance and multi-mission capability.

“The Kodiak can take off in under 1,000ft [745m] at full gross take-off weight of 7,255lb [3,290kg] and climb at over 1,300 feet per minute,” the company adds. “With powerful [Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-34] turbine performance, the Kodiak has the ability to land and take-off from unimproved surfaces and is capable of working off floats without structural upgrades.”

questkodiak

Flight Fleets Analyzer records a global fleet of more than 190 Kodiaks, the first having entered service in 2007. The Sandpoint, Idaho-based company shipped 23 examples in the first nine months of 2016, and Quest says it will pass the 200-unit delivery milestone by the end of the year.

Heard thru Flightglobal.com.

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10-31-2016thrushmrt

Pratt & Whitney Canada’s PT6A-140 series engines: a class apart in the utility and ag markets

New Powerplants Raise the Bar for Performance and Efficiency

ORLANDO, FLORIDA–(Marketwired – Oct. 31, 2016) –

Editors Note: There is a photo associated with this release.

With its new PT6A-140A turboprop engine and PT6A-140AG variant, Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) is a generation ahead of the rest. Setting new standards for performance, fuel efficiency and reliability, the PT6A-140 series is already firmly established as the powerplant of choice worldwide for original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and converters in the utility and agricultural (ag) aviation segments. The series’ rapid success has enhanced the company’s standing as an established leader in the general aviation industry. P&WC is a subsidiary of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX).

“The general aviation segment is key to our business,” says Nick Kanellias, Vice President, Marketing, responsible for General Aviation Programs. “We have continued to innovate and enhance our products and services to ensure that we offer powerful engines, cutting-edge features and unmatched versatility, backed by a proactive, seamless service and support network that puts customers at the heart of everything we do. For operators who want to propel not just their aircraft but also their business, our engines are the choice that makes sense.”

Over 350 PT6A-140 series engines have been produced to date, testifying to their popularity and remarkable record when it comes to performance and operating economics. That includes 15 percent more power and 5 percent better specific fuel consumption. With more than 230,000 flying hours accumulated and a perfect record of reliability, the series is the new benchmark in its class.

Since the PT6A-140AG was originally certified in 2012 to power the Cessna Grand Caravan EX, both of the ag aviation industry’s leading OEMs, Air Tractor and Thrush, have selected the engine for their 500-gallon aircraft. Certified by the Federal Aviation Administration in March, the Air Tractor 502XP agricultural spray plane is already helping to protect crops across the United States. A new version of Thrush’s 510P aircraft, whose certification is expected in 2017, will also be powered by the engine.

cessna grand caravan

What’s more, PT6A-140 series engines have been selected by Blackhawk Modifications Inc., StandardAero and Aircraft Structures International Corp. (ASIC) for their Cessna Caravan conversion and upgrade programs.

Optimized for “hot and high” environments, the PT6A-140A and -140AG engines offer full-load takeoff at maximum power available at 111º F (44º C), effectively helping operators to increase their productivity. The PT6A-140AG engine has 867 mechanical shaft horsepower (SHP) and 1,075 thermal SHP. With no mandatory time requirements for warm-up or cool-down, the engine enables operators to maximize their productivity and efficiency.

The PT6A-140AG is also the easiest engine in the ag segment to access and maintain, thanks to its modular design and externally mounted fuel nozzles. The time between overhauls (TBO) can be extended up to 8,000 hours or 12 years, depending on the operation, and is independent of engine cycles. Simple routine engine inspections can be done while still on-wing, in the field or in the hangar. More time on-wing and a predictable and planned maintenance environment can result in more revenue for operators.

Designed and built to outlast others in the same class, the PT6A-140AG has a minimum component life limit which is 50 percent higher than competing engines. That means it will continue to be a productive asset for any operator long after similar engines have been sent in for overhaul.

With more than 10,000 engines already enrolled in its pay-per-hour maintenance plans, P&WC is once again raising the bar with the introduction of a leading-edge Eagle Service Plan™ (ESP®) maintenance program tailored to PT6A customers, as well as a major enhancement to its current ESP plan offering. Each maintenance plan optimizes aircraft availability and performance while protecting and enhancing the value of the aircraft investment. Details can be found here: http://www.pwc.ca/en/service-support/especially-for-your-pt6.

P&WC helped build the general aviation industry with the original PT6A turboprop engine more than five decades ago. It has continued to raise the bar since then; as a result, the PT6A family remains the world’s most popular turboprop family today. Including the -140A and -140AG, there are more than 70 PT6A engine models powering over 125 different aircraft applications around the world.

P&WC will be at NBAA BACE 2016 at booth #3239. Interested operators are invited to drop by the booth to speak with a marketing or customer service representative.

Note to editors

For more information, visit our media page at www.pwc.ca/nbaa-media.

Follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/pwcanada) and Facebook(https://www.facebook.com/PrattWhitneyCanada) for our latest news and updates.

About Pratt & Whitney Canada

Founded in 1928, P&WC is a global leader in aerospace that is shaping the future of aviation with dependable, high-technology engines. Based in Longueuil, Quebec (Canada), P&WC is a subsidiary of United Technologies Corp. United Technologies Corp., based in Farmington, Connecticut, provides high-technology systems and services to the global aerospace and building systems industries.

This press release contains forward-looking statements concerning future business opportunities. Actual results may differ materially from those projected as a result of certain risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to changes in levels of demand in the aerospace industry, in levels of air travel, and in the number of aircraft to be built; challenges in the design, development, production support, performance and realization of the anticipated benefits of advanced technologies; as well as other risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to those detailed from time to time in United Technologies Corp.’s Securities and Exchange Commission filings.

To view the photo associated with this release, please visit the following link:

http://www.marketwire.com/library/20161031-PT6A-140AG_Engine800.jpg

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The T-6 Texan: Then and Now

Since it was first produced in 1937, the T-6 Texan and its offshoots have filled many roles for many different institutions in dozens of countries. It proved to be one of the more enduring, durable, and useful aircraft ever designed, and that’s further evidenced by the evolution in the 1990’s of the Beechcraft T-6 Texan II, which is a modern version of the original WWII trainer.

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Jet Speed with Turboprop Efficiency: The Epic E1000

The Epic E1000 is drawing attention for its sleek carbon-fiber design and intelligent engineering, producing the fastest turboprop available. Emerging from roughly a decade of perfecting its kit-plane predecessor (The Epic LT Dynasty), the E1000 promises to build on the devoted following growing around Epic Aircraft with exhilarating speed, fuel efficiency, and plenty of space. 

epic e 1000

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What Are The Differences between Service Bulletins and Airworthiness Directives?

Airworthiness DirectiveAn Airworthiness Directive (A.D.) is a directive issued when the FAA realizes that a perilous condition exists in a product (aircraft engine, airframe, appliance or propeller).  They notify aircraft operators and owners of potentially unsafe conditions that need special inspections, alterations, or repairs.

A Service Bulletin (S.B.) is a notice to an aircraft operator from a manufacturer informing him/her of a product improvement. An alert service bulletin is issued when an unsafe condition shows up that the manufacturer believes to be a safety related as opposed to a mere improvement of a product.

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Composite Airframes vs. Aluminum

DAYTON, Ohio -- Beech VC-6A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)
DAYTON, Ohio — Beech VC-6A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

If you are interested in aviation, even on the most casual level, then you’ve no doubt heard time and again that composite materials are both lighter and more flexible than aluminum, with a much higher elasticity.

Yet, people still build airframes using aluminum, don’t they? So it can’t be all that bad, right? The truth is that each serve their own purpose, one isn’t “better” than the other, just better depending on your goals. For instance, aluminum still tends to be cheaper than composite alloy. That is shifting, with the cost of composite materials coming down all the time, but as it stands, here and now, aluminum is still the choice for many budget-minded aviators around the world.

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The PT6 Remains True To Standards, Even In Changing Times

Air Tractor Front w COV LogoOne of the things that we truly appreciate at Covington Aircraft is the engineering innovations that go into aircraft designs. The PT6 engine is an ideal example of such a feat of design, since it has maintained its initial structure and mechanisms, but has also allowed for retrofitting older engines to perform with greater stability and efficiency. This has allowed for pilots to vastly extend their range of flight, and it has also allowed for flight in more diverse environmental conditions.

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Are The Skies Getting Too Crowded?

Are The Skies Getting Too Crowded?As aircraft enthusiasts and pilots are finding a greater demand for their commercial services, a number of changes have been witnessed in the airspace. This includes a greater volume of small aircraft that navigate the skies, along with larger commercial and military airplanes. However, these actions also require the registration of flight plans with the FAA, in order to maintain both safety and the proper operation of aircraft. Continue reading

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Navigating Modern Airspace With Greater Safety

Navigating Modern Airspace With Greater SafetyThe increased popularity and use of unmanned aircrafts vehicles (UAV) is becoming a focal point for both commercial and private pilots. Regulations on drones have been fairly lax through the FAA, although this is changing as more issues arise with airspace use for manned and unmanned vehicles. These changes will impact recreational UAV flyers as well as pilots, and are intended to provide better safety, especially for agricultural pilots. Continue reading

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