The R-985 Powered de Havilland Beaver: Arguably the Best Bush Plane Ever Built

With a big, nine-cylinder Pratt & Whitney strapped to the front, this 5,100-pound workhorse boasts a useful load of around 2,000 pounds, and it’s built to operate out of short and rough airstrips.

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Trip Report: PT6A-34 Powered Quest Kodiak Series II

Driving on an early May morning to Sandpoint, Idaho, to see the Quest Aircraft factory and then fly a new Kodiak 100 Series II to California, it was clear that icing conditions were not only forecast but likely in the wet gray clouds that shrouded the local mountains. For the flight-into-known-icing-certified Kodiak, however, icing is not a problem, and in the 11 years since it entered service, the capable utility single-engine turboprop has proven its mettle in challenging flying all over the world.

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The Cessna Conquest I: A Reliable Workhorse Is an Excellent Steed for Families and Small Corporations

This article first appeared over at AOPA here

Cessna was a little late out of the gate getting a turboprop into its lineup. First was the Cessna 441 Conquest in model year 1978, a full 14 years after Beechcraft’s King Air. Next was the Model 425 Corsair in model year 1981. The Corsair is smaller than the 441 and uses 450-shaft-horsepower Pratt & Whitney PT6s versus the 441’s Honeywell (Garrett) TPE 331 engines.

Concurrent with a max takeoff weight increase to 8,600 pounds, Cessna dropped the Corsair moniker and renamed the 425 Conquest I while reassigning the 441 the name Conquest II. Confused yet? The 425 is best described as a 421 Golden Eagle with turbines in place of pistons. Aside from sharing the same basic dimensions, the similarities between the 421 and Conquest I fade quickly. The 425 is substantially beefed up structurally and has more robust systems.

Since it’s based on a piston design, the 425 is easy to fly and an easy step up. In fact, with the easy-to-operate turbines, many would argue that the 425 is less complex than the 421. Cockpit visibility is excellent, as is the instrument panel layout. Cabin seats are comfortable once seated. Cessna’s “wide oval” cabin biases more toward elbow room than headroom, so there will be nothing close to stand-up comfort.

Performance-wise, the Conquest is good for 250 KTAS at typical cruise altitudes in the mid teens to low 20s. As is usual with turbines, the fuel burn drops off the higher you fly. Also typical of turbines, the winds will dictate choice of cruise altitude vs. fuel burn. Owners often figure 500 pounds of Jet-A the first hour and 400 pounds/hour after that. Blackhawk Modifications Inc. offers 425 owners PT6A-135 engines in place of the original -112s. The Blackhawk holds its max power to much higher altitudes than the original engines, resulting in faster time to climb and a 20-knot increase in true airspeed.

Range with tanks full is about 1,200 nm, which leaves about 700 pounds of payload. With six adults on board, range is about 700 nm. The 425 is confident at all weights on 4,000-foot runways at sea level. At lighter weights, 3,000-foot runways are doable.

Vref values a 1981 Conquest I at $625,000 while a 1986 model fetches an average of $875,000. Once an owner swallows the reality of six-figure engine overhauls, higher fuel burn, and other substantial cost increases of owning a turbine, he or she will be impressed with the Conquest’s performance and reliability.

Pete Bedell is a pilot for a major airline and co-owner of a Cessna 172 and Beechcraft Baron D55.

SPEC SHEET
Cessna 425 Conquest I

Powerplants | (2) 450-shp Pratt & Whitney PT6
Length | 35 ft 10 in
Height | 12 ft 7 in
Wingspan | 44 ft 1 in
Seats | 2+6
Max takeoff weight | 8,600 lb
Takeoff distance over 50-ft obstacle | 2,800 ft
Max cruise speed | 264 kt
Landing distance over 50-ft obstacle | 2,482 ft
Range | 1,200 nm

Peter A. Bedell

Pete Bedell is a pilot for a major airline and co-owner of a Cessna 172M and Beechcraft Baron D55.

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Protecting One of Your Largest Investments In Your Aircraft? Maintaining the PT6A

While this article is primarily all about what you do with your LARGE PT6 engine during the off season, the very first paragraph or two will cover a couple of other “Nice to Know” topics.  Large in this article relates to PT6A-60AG, -65AG, -67AG, -67F and any other model with a -60 series engine installed, like a -67R, -65B, -67D etc.   If there’s a 6 as the first number of your engine model…this article is for YOU.

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North Star Air Basler BT-67 – An Investment in the North, Fast Facts, a & Brief History

THUNDER BAY – AVIATION – Northern communities increasingly depend on a solid supply chain to get their food, fuel and medical supplies. Climate change and increasingly extreme changes in winter weather are creating problems for the winter road networks.

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4 Quick Fall Engine Tips: Now’s the Time for Preventative Maintenance on your PT6A

The squirrels in our front yard are gathering pecans, acorns, hackberrys, canned peanuts, potatoes, oranges, etc. You think I’m safe in predicting a rough winter? They’re getting ready. I would like to offer some tips for helping you get ready.

10.9.2020PT6A

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Daher celebrates the rollout of its 1,000th TBM very fast turboprop aircraft

Tarbes, France, September 21, 2020 – The 1,000th TBM made its official rollout today from Daher’s Tarbes, France final assembly line for the company’s family of very fast turboprop aircraft. This milestone airplane – a TBM 940 version – culminates 10 years of investment by Daher in making the TBM a commercial and technological success.

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A Look at the PT6A-67F Powered Air Tractor AT-802 Series

When Air Tractor AT-802A, bearing serial #0700 took off last month for its home in Valencia, Spain, the occasion was not just an airplane production milestone. It also happens to be the 25th anniversary year marking FAA Type Certification of the 800-gallon capacity agricultural and firefighting airplane. Jim Hirsch, president of Air Tractor remarked, “It’s been almost 27 years since the first AT-802 test flight over Olney, Texas. The airplane had to overcome some initial hurdles, but the 802 series has become a popular aircraft that is used all over the world for a wide variety of highly specialized applications.” He continued, “Over the years we’ve focused on improving the flying qualities and handling characteristics of the 802 so that it is as enjoyable to fly as our smaller models. This makes for an extremely productive aircraft that keeps pilot fatigue at a minimum—which is another reason for the airplane’s success.”

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